The Triumph Dolomite Club - Discussion Forum

The Number One Club for owners of Triumph's range of small saloons from the 1960s and 1970s.
It is currently Tue Oct 27, 2020 6:25 am

All times are UTC




Post new topic  Reply to topic  [ 10 posts ] 
Author Message
PostPosted: Sat Oct 17, 2020 8:37 pm 
Offline
TDC Member

Joined: Thu Sep 28, 2006 9:06 pm
Posts: 981
Location: Bristol
Next week I propose to purchase a dial gauge so that I can check the end play in my 1500cc dolomites as I suspect that in at least one of my cars the thrust washers need changing. I have read in the workshop manual that the sump can be removed and the thrust washers changed with the engine still in the car.

Has anyone on the discussion board done this task and how difficult is it to do?

I also believe that some owners used to get both the main and the conrod bearings changed at about 60,000 miles. If I attempt to sort out the crank end float is it worth changing the main and conrod bearings at the same time?

If I do go for a bearing change is there a specific make of bearing that I should attempt to purchase?


Top
   
PostPosted: Sun Oct 18, 2020 7:03 am 
Offline
TDC Member

Joined: Mon Dec 03, 2012 6:04 pm
Posts: 1233
I've done it and it is really easy. Remove the sump, remove the bearing cap to get the bottom one out and then use something like a feeler gauge or small screw driver to get the top one out. I found rotating the crank help persuade it to move.

Then fitting is the reverse, make sure you have the washer the right way round and gently push the top washer round the crank. Once it is properly position refit the bottom washer and bearing cap, job done.

That is provided you have caught it early enough and you don't find the washers in the bottom of the sump.

As for the other bearings I don't suppose it would hurt to have a peak while you're in there. The only ones I could find were King bearings, which I gather aren't the best. I would put a wanted as on the forum to see if someone has something a bit better, assuming it needs doing.


Top
   
PostPosted: Sun Oct 18, 2020 8:00 am 
Offline
TDC Member

Joined: Wed Jun 14, 2017 11:24 am
Posts: 34
Hi, I did mine as as previously said it’s not a difficult job, I found if yo get the lower shell out and straighten it from the centre in a vice, (Straighten The end with the lug) you can then use it to push the top one out,


Top
   
PostPosted: Sun Oct 18, 2020 8:25 am 
Offline
TDC Member
User avatar

Joined: Tue Oct 03, 2006 4:42 pm
Posts: 4080
Location: Forest of Dean
I think I used to do mine at 40k miles. I spent ages trying to source good bearings the first time, they were findable but seriously ouch on the wallet. Instead I used wherever moss sell and treated them as a service item.
As already said rotating the crank helps with moving the upper bearing, take the plugs out to make that easy.
If memory serves I used to drain the oil then jack it into ramps to give max room underneath, release the engine mounts and use a lifting bar to raise the engine. It only needs to go up enough to unload the mounts plus a half inch to make sump removal dead easy. That's about as much as it will go without removing hoses.

_________________
1978 Pageant Sprint - the rustomite, 1972 Spitfire IV - sprintfire project, 1968 Valencia GT6 II - little Blue, 1980 Vermillion 1500HL - resting. 1974 Sienna 1500TC, Mrs Weevils big brown.


Top
   
PostPosted: Sun Oct 18, 2020 9:49 am 
Offline
TDC Member

Joined: Thu Sep 28, 2006 9:06 pm
Posts: 981
Location: Bristol
Many thanks for the quick responses and you have encouraged me to have a go. Living in Bristol I am lucky as Moss have a branch here and looking at their web sight the total cost of bits is not too bad.

I can see that it does not look too difficult to change the main and Conrod bearings but how difficult is it to get out and fit replacement thrust bearings?


Top
   
PostPosted: Sun Oct 18, 2020 9:41 pm 
Offline
TDC Member
User avatar

Joined: Tue Oct 03, 2006 4:42 pm
Posts: 4080
Location: Forest of Dean
Odd, I thought I'd already replied to this :scratchin:
No harder than the rest. Just rotate the crank while using a new one to push the old one out.

_________________
1978 Pageant Sprint - the rustomite, 1972 Spitfire IV - sprintfire project, 1968 Valencia GT6 II - little Blue, 1980 Vermillion 1500HL - resting. 1974 Sienna 1500TC, Mrs Weevils big brown.


Top
   
PostPosted: Mon Oct 19, 2020 6:21 am 
Offline
TDC Member

Joined: Sun Oct 26, 2008 7:26 am
Posts: 2156
Re sump removal, best leave the car at least 24 hours from last engine start, ideally 48. So I have always drained the oil (when warm) and then left it.
I have tried King etc trimetal and tin/ali bearings. Neither seemed to last better than the other, but old glacier/AE are better. And if you ever find them, Vandervell are excellent.

_________________
Clive Senior
Brighton
Driving Toledo fitted with slant 4, sprint OD box and axle. Needs fettling!


Top
   
PostPosted: Mon Oct 19, 2020 3:23 pm 
Offline
TDC Member

Joined: Mon Dec 03, 2012 6:04 pm
Posts: 1233
Quote:
Many thanks for the quick responses and you have encouraged me to have a go. Living in Bristol I am lucky as Moss have a branch here and looking at their web sight the total cost of bits is not too bad.

I can see that it does not look too difficult to change the main and Conrod bearings but how difficult is it to get out and fit replacement thrust bearings?
The instructions in the thread are for the thrust washers. Once you have the sump off it becomes obvious how to remove them and you shouldn't have any problems, provided you have caught it early enough.


Top
   
PostPosted: Tue Oct 20, 2020 9:10 am 
Offline
TDC Norfolk/Suffolk Area Organiser

Joined: Thu May 17, 2012 8:34 pm
Posts: 698
You can do it in the car easily enough.
But I would not personally. You can't measure the crank properly in situ to check for ovality and clearances. You can't polish the crank to remove marks. You can't properly clean everything or blow through the oil ways. Imo, it's worth a few hours to get the engine out then you can work on it in comfort on a bench, and do a proper job.


Top
   
PostPosted: Sat Oct 24, 2020 9:17 am 
Offline
Future Club member hopefully!
Future Club member hopefully!
User avatar

Joined: Tue Oct 03, 2006 6:38 pm
Posts: 2633
Location: Birmingham
From memory I seem to recall that its quite hard to access the rear thrust washer with engine installed, though I can't remember why, probably the rear crank seal housing in the way?

I still have stocks of standard size AE Glacier mains, big ends and thrust washers here which I could sell if you get stuck. Thrust washers are hard to find from a good manufacturer, I sometimes used a work-around using a good quality one for the rear (the one that takes all the load from the clutch thrust) and a matching lower-quality one for the front one which takes almost no load at all. The thrust washers in standard - unmodified - fit are fore and aft, not upper and lower, no washers are fitted to the main bearing cap.

Personally I'd get the engine out and do the job properly, if you have the time.

_________________
Vindicator Sprint, Honda Fireblade RRX 919cc, re-powered by AB Performance. Quick.
1995 Trusty Peugeot 306 XND, no turbine, 242K miles young.
1997 Trusty Peugeot 306 GLX TD, 90K miles and soon to ride again..
Alfa Romeo 147 1.9 JTD 150 Ti Lusso , no longer smoking.
Various other transient runners for selling.


Top
   
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic  Reply to topic  [ 10 posts ] 

All times are UTC


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Google [Bot] and 15 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Limited