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PostPosted: Wed Feb 03, 2021 5:16 pm 
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Joined: Tue May 06, 2014 3:38 pm
Posts: 268
Location: Canvey Island, Essex
Replacing Rear-Suspension Dampers – April 1983

Sometime in late-1982 or early-1983, it was noticed that the original factory-fitted suspension dampers had started to weep oil. Consequently, in mid-February 1983, I purchased some new replacement dampers by mail order from Quip Accessories in Cleckheaton, Yorkshire. The dampers which were said to be “20% uprated over standard”, were Monroe Radialmatic (part No. R3354), costing £31•05 for the pair, including VAT and carriage.

At that time, I was a still a postgraduate engineering student at Cranfield, where Mark Tothill (fellow student who owned the Triumph Dolomite Sprint) later loaned me his coil-spring compressors, enabling me whilst home for the weekend, to replace the rear dampers on 2nd April 1983, at a mileage of 31,176. These dampers were still serviceable when I laid-up the car in mid-1999, at a total mileage of 101,024.

QUIP receipt – Monroe Radialmatic R3354 Toledo shock absorbers

Image

_________________
Regards.

Nigel A. Skeet

Independent tutor of mathematics, physics, technology & engineering, for secondary, tertiary, further & higher education.

https://www.linkedin.com/profile/view?id=308177758

Upgraded 1974 Triumph Toledo 1300 (Toledo / Dolomite HL / Sprint hybrid)

Onetime member + magazine editor & technical editor of Volkswagen Type 2 Owners' Club


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PostPosted: Wed Feb 03, 2021 5:20 pm 
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Posts: 268
Location: Canvey Island, Essex
Substitute & Supplementary, Right & Left Hand TEX Door Mirrors – Autumn 1983

At the time of purchase, the Toledo was equipped with a Wingard, ceiling-mounted, black-plastic, interior rear-view mirror and a single stainless-steel TEX door-mirror fitted to the offside (i.e. driver’s side) front door, but I felt handicapped by the lack of a rear-view mirror on the nearside; especially when driving on motorways, dual-carriageways, roundabouts or one-way streets, where rearward vision on the nearside can often be critical and looking over one’s left shoulder isn’t always safe or practical.

Board index » The Triumph Dolomite Club » Dolomite-related [Start here!] » Exterior rear-view mirrors: which were factory standard; door or wing mounted?

https://forum.triumphdolomite.co.uk/vie ... =4&t=34789

After approximately two years of regularly travelling to and from Cranfield at the weekends (i.e. Friday & Sunday evenings), over an 80 mile cross-country route, I had become wearied by not having a nearside, external rear-view door mirror (unlike our 1973 VW 1600 Type 2 campervan, on which it was a standard factory fitment), so it was fortunate that on one of my visits to Halfords, during autumn 1983, I came across a TEX brand, stainless-steel, nearside accessory door-mirror, of a similar pattern to my existing TEX, stainless-steel, offside door-mirror.

Although at first glance, the accessory mirror appeared almost identical, there were noticeable differences as follows:

• Convex, blue-tinted anti-dazzle lens, instead of plane, un-tinted lens;
• Black-plastic contoured mounting-gasket, instead of white-plastic gasket;
• Different shape of mirror-housing mounting base.

Recognising the advantage of having convex, blue-tinted anti-dazzle lenses and not wishing to have non-matching mirrors, I bought a matching pair of the TEX brand, stainless-steel, offside & nearside accessory door-mirrors and kept my original offside mirror as a spare. The details marked on the original packaging, were as follows:

TEX Parts Ltd.
Witney Trading Estate
Station Lane
Witney
Oxfordshire
OX8 6YD.

TEX ‘ANTI-DAZZLE’ Door Mirror
Part No. M68890 – –
RIGHT HAND CONVEX POLISHED

TEX ‘ANTI-DAZZLE’ Door Mirror
Part No. M68891 – –
LEFT HAND CONVEX POLISHED

With both of these fitted, I felt much more confident on the roads, having eliminated at least some of the rear-quarter blind-spots. The tinted anti-dazzle feature, was also much appreciated during night driving, when cars approaching from behind with their headlamps on main beam, had previously been the major source of glare - visual discomfort. Sometimes I experienced similar discomfort, from low winter-sun.

I would also have appreciated an interior rear-view mirror, with an anti-dazzle feature, but at that time was unaware that at least some Triumph Dolomite models were equipped with a “dipping” interior rear-view mirror, one of which I have since acquired.

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

For my own interest, I recently did an Internet search to see what I could find regarding the TEX door mirrors. It appears that the same accessory door mirrors, with the same part numbers, fitted with convex, tinted mirror lenses, are still available. Not only that, but there are mirrors of the same type in black-painted finish, rather than polished stainless-steel, albeit with slightly different part numbers. One can also obtain spare parts for the mirrors.

https://www.motoringclassics.co.uk/part ... steel.html

https://www.motoringclassics.co.uk/inde ... 68891.html


https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B01ANT6DCQ/ ... 526_931641

https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B01ANTBQYQ/ ... 581_931857


http://texautomotive.com/classic.html

http://texautomotive.com/classic_exterior_mirrors.html

http://texautomotive.com/classic_mirror_spares.html

http://texautomotive.com/mirror_glass.html

The TEX company’s current contact details, are as follows:

Tex Automotive Limited
Cotswold Business Park
Range Road
Witney
Oxfordshire
OX29 0YB
England

Tel: +44 (0)1993 893500

Fax: +44 (0)1993 707222

Email: info@texautomotive.com

Website: http://texautomotive.com

_________________
Regards.

Nigel A. Skeet

Independent tutor of mathematics, physics, technology & engineering, for secondary, tertiary, further & higher education.

https://www.linkedin.com/profile/view?id=308177758

Upgraded 1974 Triumph Toledo 1300 (Toledo / Dolomite HL / Sprint hybrid)

Onetime member + magazine editor & technical editor of Volkswagen Type 2 Owners' Club


Last edited by naskeet on Fri Feb 05, 2021 2:24 pm, edited 2 times in total.

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PostPosted: Fri Feb 05, 2021 2:04 pm 
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Joined: Tue May 06, 2014 3:38 pm
Posts: 268
Location: Canvey Island, Essex
Experiment with Variation of Tyre Pressure – circa 1982 or 1983

Both the Triumph Toledo 1300 owners’ handbook and official BLMC Triumph Toledo 13/1500 workshop manual, specify tyre-inflation pressures of 22 psi & 26 psi for the front & rear tyres respectively, for the original factory-fitted 155 SR13 radial tyres, mounted on 4J x 13 inch steel wheels.

When my father bought the six-month old, ex-demonstrator 1974 four-door Triumph Toledo 1300 in May 1975, it had already been retro-fitted by Mann Egerton with 5½ x 13 inch Cosmic aluminium-alloy wheels and 175 SR13, Uniroyal Rallye 180, steel-braced radial tyres, but they hadn’t specified any alternative tyre pressures, for these substitute wheels & tyres, so I had always inflated the front & rear tyres to 22 psi & 26 psi respectively.

Using tyre-inflation pressures (as indicated on the hand-held PCL pencil-gauge or foot-pump gauge) of 22 psi & 26 psi in front & rear tyres respectively, I never observed uneven tread-wear patterns which might have suggested over-inflation or under-inflation.

Sometime in the early-1980s, whilst I was studying at Cranfield Institute of Technology, I learned from a fellow student who owned a Triumph Dolomite 1500, that the specified tyre-inflation pressures for the Triumph Dolomite 13/1500, were 26 psi & 30 psi for the front & rear tyres respectively; 4 psi more than for the slightly shorter and lighter-weight Triumph Toledo.

Having read that increased tyre-inflation pressures confer more precise steering and reduced rolling resistance (i.e. reduce fuel consumption), but mindful of the uneven tyre wear associated with either under-inflation or over-inflation, I decided to try slightly increasing the inflation pressures of my Toledo’s front and rear 175 SR13, Kelly-Springfield tyres.

Not being as heavy as a Dolomite 13/1500, I opted for 24 psi & 28 psi for the front & rear tyres respectively. This certainly made the steering lighter and more responsive, but I didn’t run the car long enough with these increased inflation pressures, to discover whether they gave any statistically significant reduction in fuel consumption.

One undesirable side effect of increasing the inflation pressures, was that the car became noticeably skittish, when negotiating a particular bend (I rounded it twice a week for nearly 3½ years) whose road surface was uneven (i.e. bumps or corrugations), so I reverted to the original tyre-inflation pressures of 22 psi & 26 psi for the front & rear tyres respectively.

This skittishness was probably attributable to the increased vertical stiffness of the inflated tyres, which act as air-springs in series with the suspension’s helical coil springs, thus increasing the suspension’s overall stiffness. I also suspect that substituting ultra-low profile tyres of sizes such as 185/55 R15 or 195/55 R15, might similarly confer such skittishness owing to the greater vertical stiffness of said tyres.

Ultra-low-profile tyres, of sizes 185/55 R15, 195/55 R15 & 205/50 R15 are commonly fitted to the 5½ x 15 inch & 6 x 15 inch alloy wheels, of the MG 2•0 Maestro & Maestro-Turbo, MG 2•0 Montego & Montego-Turbo and MG F & TF, which could potentially be substituted onto Triumph Toledos & Dolomites, so the matter of possible skittishness needs to be kept in mind.

I was also running the front wheels at more negative camber than the factory-standard specifications, having completely removed the stacked pairs of camber-adjustment shims from between the front sub-frame and the upper portion of the front-suspension wishbone-brackets. Despite this, there was no indication of any noticeable tyre-shoulder wear.

I have also since become aware that increasing a tyre’s inflation-pressure decreases a tyre’s slip angle when subjected to a lateral force and vice versa. As a consequence of changing tyres’ slip angles, one can also change the degree of over-steer or under-steer characteristics. This is one reason why rear-engined, rear-wheel-drive vehicles have traditionally had substantially higher inflation-pressures in the rear tyres compared to those at the front, because decreasing a rear tyre’s slip angle relative to that at the front, reduces the tendency to over-steer.

_________________
Regards.

Nigel A. Skeet

Independent tutor of mathematics, physics, technology & engineering, for secondary, tertiary, further & higher education.

https://www.linkedin.com/profile/view?id=308177758

Upgraded 1974 Triumph Toledo 1300 (Toledo / Dolomite HL / Sprint hybrid)

Onetime member + magazine editor & technical editor of Volkswagen Type 2 Owners' Club


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PostPosted: Fri Feb 12, 2021 5:41 pm 
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Joined: Tue May 06, 2014 3:38 pm
Posts: 268
Location: Canvey Island, Essex
Substituted 7-inch Lucas 20-20 Homofocal Front Fog Lamps – January 1983

In contrast to my home region of South East Essex, I frequently encountered extremely foggy conditions, in Bedfordshire, in circa February and November, when driving my Triumph Toledo, during my postgraduate engineering studies at Cranfield, from October 1980 to May 1984.

The original “matched” pair of Lucas Square-8 fog & spot lamps (i.e. one of each), that had been retro-fitted below the front bumper, by Mann Egerton in Leigh-on-Sea, Essex, sometime prior to my father purchasing the car in May 1975, had proved to be ineffective as fog lamps, on previous occasions when fog lamps would have been useful. This was why I later reassigned the single Lucas Square-8 fog lamp, to be a supplementary reversing lamp mounted onto the underside of the rear bumper-bracket and put the single Lucas Square-8 spot lamp in storage.

Sometime earlier from an article-reprint I had acquired, I learned of Lucas 20/20 Homofocal, 7 inch diameter, front fog lamps and auxiliary driving lamps which were reviewed in the British motoring magazine “Motor” (see David Windsor & Maurice Rowe, "A British Lamp to Beat the World", Motor, week ending 8th November 1980), comparing them with well known, rival products from Bosch, Hella, Cibie and Wipac.

On the basis of that rave review and the fact that these lamps (albeit with H3 100W bulbs) had been adopted by the British international-car-rally team, I bought a pair of fog lamps from the local branch of Halfords, for the princely sum of £18 each. At the same time, I also bought a pair of moulded-plastic Lucas 20/20 lamp covers, to protect the lamps from stone-impact damage when the lamps were not in use.

Fitting the moulded-plastic lamp covers was easy, but removing them was quite challenging, especially when the plastic was cold and stiff. With hindsight, I would have preferred some wire-mesh protectors and/or some elasticated, padded, fabric (e.g. yellow nylon fabric with a black Triumph laurel-leaf emblem), lamp covers; both of which I am considering for the future.

I was unimpressed with the lamp mounting brackets retro-fitted by Mann Egerton, to mount the “matched” pair of Lucas Square-8 fog & spot lamps. They were simply L-shaped brackets that were bolted to the outboard sections of the front bumper brackets and didn’t position the lamps as I would wish.

Instead, I chose to have circa 25 mm wide strips of 3 mm thick steel-plate, welded between both sides of the bumper brackets, flush with the bottoms of the brackets and parallel to the underside trailing edge of the front bumper, which proved to be a very neat and secure form of fog-lamp mounting. This was the same configuration that I later used for the mounting bracket on the offside rear-bumper bracket, to mount the previously mentioned supplementary Lucas Square-8 auxiliary reversing light.

I thus fitted below the front bumper, a matched pair, of 7 inch, Lucas 20-20, homofocal, rally fog lamps (with standard H3 55W quartz halogen bulbs), which were to prove indispensable, over the next few years.

I found that my Lucas 20-20 fog lamps, gave kerb to kerb, lateral illumination, from 5 metres in front of the car and projected a flat horizontal beam (with sharp vertical cut-off), over a distance of at least 50 metres; even in quite thick fog, with virtually no reflected glare.

Image

Image

The advantages of good quality fog lamps (used in conjunction with the side lights, but with the headlamps switched off), are particularly noticeable at night, of which I had a graphic demonstration, on my way home from Cranfield to Canvey Island, via the A507, out of Stotfold towards Baldock, one Friday evening, as I approached the large roundabout, forming the junction between the A507 and A1. A car, using dipped headlamps, some distance in front of me, struck the inner kerb of the roundabout, which together with the roundabout's outer kerb, I could clearly see at that moment, with the aid of my Lucas 20-20 fog lamps.

As a consequence of driving relatively long distances in fog, I discovered the insidious effect of a thin film of minute water droplets (similar in size to what would be produced by an atomiser) building up on the external surface of the windscreen. The effect is to give the impression that the fog itself is becoming increasing dense, but more often than not, the decrease in visibility is associated with increasing temporary opacity of the windscreen, as a result of increasing water-droplet build-up.

Hence, it is important to regularly use one’s windscreen wipers to clear the water-droplet build-up, for which just a single sweep is usually all that is needed. This was something for which the flick-wipe facility of steering-column mounted windscreen wiper & washer switch (substituted from a Triumph Dolomite), proved to be particularly useful. However this relies on constantly being alert to changing visibility and realising the need to use the windscreen wipers, for which the cognitive burden can be potentially reduced, by having an after-market, rain-sensing wiper-controller, such as the OEDES Raintracker™ RT-50 & RT-50A kit. The following magazine article reviews the associated literature.

Nigel A. Skeet, "Rain Tracker RT-50, Universal, Rain-Sensing, Automatic Windscreen-Wiper Controller", Transporter Talk, Issue 77, June 2005, Pages 38~43.

The positioning and operation of front fog lamps, for vehicles of various vintages, are covered in the Road Vehicles’ Lighting Regulations as follows:

The Road Vehicles Lighting Regulations 1989, UK Statutory Instruments 1989, No. 1796

http://www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/1989 ... tents/made

The Road Vehicles Lighting Regulations 1989, UK Statutory Instruments 1989, No. 1796, SCHEDULE 6

http://www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/1989 ... ule/6/made

As implied earlier, the electrical circuit I adopted for my front fog lamps, was to take the live feed for the fog-lamp switch, from that for the sidelights. Had I unwisely taken the live feed for the fog-lamp switch, from that for the headlamp dipped-beam, as is required in some countries like the USA, both the front fog lights and headlamp dipped-beams would operate together, negating all of the advantages of fitting the front fog lights!

Given that the two front fog lamps were both fitted with H3 55W quartz-halogen bulbs, requiring a total of at least 9•2 A @ 12 V or as much as 11•0 A @ 14•4 V (i.e. maximum “advisable” regulated alternator voltage, charging a 12 V lead-acid battery), the load-current for the lamps was supplied directly from an independently-fused battery supply, via a 30 A relay, mounted on the left-hand side of the engine compartment, close to the battery.

By the winter of 1982/83, I had already substituted the Dolomite HL adjustable steering column with associated switches and moulded black-plastic nacelle. Having ample space for at least three more switches in this nacelle, I elected to fit a double-throw toggle switch (salvaged second-hand headlamp switch) on the left-hand side of the nacelle, to serve both the front & rear fog lamps.

_________________
Regards.

Nigel A. Skeet

Independent tutor of mathematics, physics, technology & engineering, for secondary, tertiary, further & higher education.

https://www.linkedin.com/profile/view?id=308177758

Upgraded 1974 Triumph Toledo 1300 (Toledo / Dolomite HL / Sprint hybrid)

Onetime member + magazine editor & technical editor of Volkswagen Type 2 Owners' Club


Last edited by naskeet on Sun Feb 21, 2021 5:22 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Tue Feb 16, 2021 4:10 pm 
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Joined: Tue May 06, 2014 3:38 pm
Posts: 268
Location: Canvey Island, Essex
Retro-Fitted a Lucas Square-8 Supplementary Reversing Lamp – Autumn 1983

By the autumn of 1983, I had become increasingly frustrated by my inability to see adequately, to reverse at night in an unlit driveway or car park, using the pair of dealership-fitted Lumax reversing lamps, with 20W festoon bulbs, that were panel-mounted immediately below the rear combination lamp clusters. This was a particularly acute problem in the pitch-black, crowded car park, to the rear of Lanchester Hall, at Cranfield Institute of Technology, to which I returned from home late on Sunday evenings.

Consequently, I decided to retro-fit the surplus Lucas Square-8 front fog lamp, as a supplementary high-intensity reversing lamp. To fit this lamp, I had the option of mounting it either (a) onto the underside of the rear bumper, (b) mounting it to the bodywork by means of a custom bracket, or (c) onto the offside rear bumper bracket by means of a custom bracket. It wouldn’t be practical to mount the lamp onto the nearside rear bumper bracket, owing to the presence of the rear exhaust tailpipe. I didn’t like options (a) & (b), but option (c) seemed to be the most practical and avoided drilling holes in either the rear bumper or bodywork.

Consequently, I chose to have circa 25 mm wide strips of 3 mm thick steel-plate, welded between both sides of the bumper bracket, flush with the bottom of the bracket and parallel to the underside trailing edge of the front bumper, which proved to be a very neat and secure form of lamp mounting. This was the same configuration that I previously used for the lamp-mounting brackets on the front-bumper brackets, to mount the pair of Lucas 20/20 Homofocal front fog lamps.

To minimise the likelihood of the supplementary reversing lamp being left on by mistake, I adopted an electrical circuit, whereby by the supplementary manual reversing-light switch, took its positive electrical supply from the sidelights and a tell-tale lamp incorporated in the switch-bracket below the Toledo dashboard, showed when the supplementary reversing lamp was switched on.

Several months later in March 1984, when I purchased and substituted the early-model Triumph Dolomite 1850 dashboard, I used a yellow-lensed tell-tale lamp, that was one of those that were otherwise unallocated in the 60 mm diameter, Lucas 6WL 8-segment warning light cluster, in the centre of the convex instrument panel. Owing to the human eyes’ high sensitivity to yellow light, yellow tell-tale or warning lights in one’s main zone of vision, are difficult to overlook.

Board index » The Triumph Dolomite Club » Dolomite-related [Start here!] » Customising Lucas 60 mm, 8-Segment, Warning-Light Clusters

viewtopic.php?f=4&t=29490

With hindsight, it might have been better to have incorporated an .AND. logic gate, so that the supplementary reversing lamp would only illuminate when the sidelights (or alternatively the dipped headlamps) and the dealership-fitted accessory Lumax 20W reversing lamps were both illuminated. This is an upgrade, together with an accessory relay, which I might incorporate in the future. It might also be beneficial to substitute a modern low-power, high-intensity LED bulb with H3 mounting flange, into the Lucas Square-8 lamp.

When the Lucas Square-8, H3 55W quartz-halogen supplementary reversing lamp was not in use off-road in driveways and car parks, the opaque, moulded black-plastic lamp cover was fitted for reason of legality; it being contrary to the road-vehicle lighting regulations to show more than two white lights to the rear, especially of such high intensity. Unless I had used the lamp when on the brow of a hill, with the lamp facing uphill, there was never any danger of drivers being dazzled, owing to the low-height position of the lamp below the rear bumper and the alignment of the lamp to provide a low, flat light beam.

The positioning and operation of reversing lamps, for vehicles of various vintages, are covered in the Road Vehicles’ Lighting Regulations as follows:

The Road Vehicles Lighting Regulations 1989, UK Statutory Instruments 1989, No. 1796

http://www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/1989 ... tents/made

The Road Vehicles Lighting Regulations 1989, UK Statutory Instruments 1989, No. 1796, SCHEDULE 14

https://www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/198 ... le/14/made

At the time I undertook the retro-fitment of a supplementary reversing light in 1983, I did not have access to the then current edition of the Road Vehicles Lighting Regulations, but I did possess the following book and various AA information leaflets:

Marcus Jacobson (Consulting Editor), “AA Book of Driving”, Automobile Association, 1980, ISBN 0-86145-021-3.

In the following section of the book, it states:

Winter driving accessories – Living with the car - Lights, Page 177.

« Reversing lights are another very useful accessory. No more than two should be fitted, and they can only be used when reversing. The use of a fog or spotlight for this purpose is prohibited. The bulbs in these lights should be no more than 24 watts in strength. Control of reversing lights is usually automatic from the gearbox. Where this is not the case, there must be a warning light on the dashboard or on the switch. »

_________________
Regards.

Nigel A. Skeet

Independent tutor of mathematics, physics, technology & engineering, for secondary, tertiary, further & higher education.

https://www.linkedin.com/profile/view?id=308177758

Upgraded 1974 Triumph Toledo 1300 (Toledo / Dolomite HL / Sprint hybrid)

Onetime member + magazine editor & technical editor of Volkswagen Type 2 Owners' Club


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