The Triumph Dolomite Club - Discussion Forum

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PostPosted: Thu Nov 15, 2018 5:53 pm 
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When I acquired my car 9.5 years ago the plan was to get it on the road.
Then that changed into keeping it running as long as possible.
Now it's changed into new body panels (on-going) removal of all rust and a respray (hopefully early 2020) and ultimately gearbox and bottom end engine overhaul.
By that time I'll be using my bus pass.
So I guess now my long term plan for the car is to have it survive me, and that will entail selling it at some point hopefully in the VERY distant future to an enthusiast who can do stuff.

I know some people on here have bought purely as an investment with a view to doing extremely low mileage and reaping the cash later.

What's YOUR plan for your classics? Be interesting to hear from the much younger owners and daily drivers out there.


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PostPosted: Thu Nov 15, 2018 6:54 pm 
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I bought my Toledo almost exactly 10 years ago (about 2 weeks after I wrote my spitfire off on the RBRR 2008)
It was a stopgap, replacing the trusty but beyond help herald estate. And while I was going to build my next spitfire (took 6 years!)

Anyway, the Toledo was my daily driver, and I also used it competitively doing 12 car rallies, autosolos, PCTs and a few grass autotests. My then 14 year old daughter was turning into a remarkably good navigator (she won loads of stuff, surprising others as a 14 year old girl was beating them!)

The car did some trackdays, and killed a few engines. It was also starting to be sidelined as siad daughter went to Uni, and the spitfire was built (much faster and convertible....) Thepoor toledo satunloved and rarely used. I almost scrapped it.

Then I was given a sprint axle, and bought a TR7 engine plus a sprint box. The car was revived and much better than before. Still way slower than the spitfire though. Anyway, it has done 2 RBRR's, been pressed into everyday use from time to time, and we do the occasional rally or similar event. No show car, and I suspect it will eventually be scrapped as all expensive/difficult bits are showing their age. However, it will be around for a few more years, and will be kept on the road until it really is no longer viable. At which point whatever is useful will be re-homed.

So it will be a sad ending. And unless somebody is willing to save it by buying it as a going concern (unlikely, though it is a well sorted car if untidy) I won't be doing a restoration. But I certainly never view cars as investments. They really need to be exercised. And hard.

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Clive Senior
Brighton
Driving Toledo fitted with slant 4, sprint OD box and axle. Needs fettling!


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PostPosted: Thu Nov 15, 2018 10:39 pm 
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Joined: Sat Jul 15, 2017 7:50 pm
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Location: Kent
My car all be it an 1850 i bought because i liked the car and not as an investment but i must say having a car in such good condition does spoil the fun for me as i am always looking at the weather, i don't take it out if raining, i dont mind if i get caught out or pre booked a show and its raining but you get the idea.

I am now thinking of selling as i feel the car needs to be used rather than tucked up in the garage with a custom made cover on.

I think its that time of year where the weather changes and the car gets used less

Pete


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PostPosted: Fri Nov 16, 2018 12:57 pm 
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I have had my 1982 reg. 1300 for nearly 6 years now. I was not looking for a Dolomite but came across this one and took the plunge. It was very original and had won a few best in shows but was showing now a few bits of deterioration and the servicing had been a little lax. I sorted out the minor mechanical bits at first and then looked into the bodywork. Due to my lack of skills in that part I consulted with a restorer who advised me that because it was so good and original to leave it, "it was in the original condition that everyone wants a classic car to be seen in". I just wanted it to be 100% in every aspect but took this advice which was probably correct at the time but now wonder if I should have ignored it.

I take it to one or two shows a year where it always gets attention, runs out every week or so (weather permitting) in the Yorkshire countryside of 20 to 60 miles or so, and enjoy it. It doesn't get mollycoddled as my old dad would say, but it gets looked after and cherished. Now after spending far more than the car is worth on keeping up with everything that it has thrown at me, and making sure it is always as 100% as possible I would be hard pushed to let it go. Its just to far under my skin, I love it to bits and enjoy it so much. Sometimes I long for more power, a classic that is more suited to motorways. Something more comfortable, at times it agravates my bad back reducing its use. Its a classic so its a money pit that pushes my pension at times, but then parting with it, I couldn't. If I had room I would consider another to join it and that would possibly be an 1850.

So long term plan, well youve probably guessed, keep it for as long as I can and can drive it. The only thing that I can see ending that sooner is when the time comes and major restoration becomes necessary. The maths then does not make sence, the cost to do it will never be recouped when 1300 values are so poor. As some of you know it was recently proffesionally valued at £5500 for insurance after members said my valuation was too low. But lets be realistic, if I put her up for sale here it would probably realise less than half this and with £6000-£7000 being a recent speculative quote for a strip and respary (not that its needed yet at all) in that senario breaking would probably be the only fate.


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PostPosted: Fri Nov 16, 2018 1:49 pm 
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Quote:
I have had my 1982 reg. 1300 for nearly 6 years now. I was not looking for a Dolomite but came across this one and took the plunge. It was very original and had won a few best in shows but was showing now a few bits of deterioration and the servicing had been a little lax. I sorted out the minor mechanical bits at first and then looked into the bodywork. Due to my lack of skills in that part I consulted with a restorer who advised me that because it was so good and original to leave it, "it was in the original condition that everyone wants a classic car to be seen in". I just wanted it to be 100% in every aspect but took this advice which was probably correct at the time but now wonder if I should have ignored it.

I take it to one or two shows a year where it always gets attention, runs out every week or so (weather permitting) in the Yorkshire countryside of 20 to 60 miles or so, and enjoy it. It doesn't get mollycoddled as my old dad would say, but it gets looked after and cherished. Now after spending far more than the car is worth on keeping up with everything that it has thrown at me, and making sure it is always as 100% as possible I would be hard pushed to let it go. Its just to far under my skin, I love it to bits and enjoy it so much. Sometimes I long for more power, a classic that is more suited to motorways. Something more comfortable, at times it agravates my bad back reducing its use. Its a classic so its a money pit that pushes my pension at times, but then parting with it, I couldn't. If I had room I would consider another to join it and that would possibly be an 1850.

So long term plan, well youve probably guessed, keep it for as long as I can and can drive it. The only thing that I can see ending that sooner is when the time comes and major restoration becomes necessary. The maths then does not make sence, the cost to do it will never be recouped when 1300 values are so poor. As some of you know it was recently proffesionally valued at £5500 for insurance after members said my valuation was too low. But lets be realistic, if I put her up for sale here it would probably realise less than half this and with £6000-£7000 being a recent speculative quote for a strip and respary (not that its needed yet at all) in that senario breaking would probably be the only fate.
Theres always James with his dolomite aed.

Jeroen

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PostPosted: Mon Nov 19, 2018 8:48 pm 
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For both of mine it’s the same answer: Drive with enthusiasm! :-D

More specifically:
‘74 Dolly - take back to Honeysuckle from Inca (maybe), attach the Sprint engine I’m rebuilding to that damned Sprint ‘box it has fitted.
‘78 Sprint - take back to White from Inca (definately), fix the very rotten shell and actually drive it on the road someday...

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Bradman.

ImageImage

Current classic cars: 1974 Triumph Dolomite (Honey), 1978 Triumph Dolomite Sprint (Holly)
Current modern cars: 2003 BMW Z4 roadster 3.0 (Marty), 2010 Mini One (Rusty), 2018 VW Touran (Jack Sparrow)
Past classic cars: 1972 Triumph Spitfire IV with 2.0 I6 (Polly), 1972 Ford Escort 1100L with RS2000 running gear (Nora Batty)


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PostPosted: Mon Nov 19, 2018 8:57 pm 
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I paid £700 for my 1500 in 2006, spent >13K restoring it and wouldn't care if it was still worth £700 because I don't intend parting with it; I love it so much.
When I'm driving it, I feel young again.
My main worry is what happens to petrol availability when we've all gone electric.


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PostPosted: Mon Nov 19, 2018 9:17 pm 
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Joined: Sat Jun 02, 2018 9:38 am
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Quote:
I paid £700 for my 1500 in 2006, spent >13K restoring it and wouldn't care if it was still worth £700 because I don't intend parting with it; I love it so much.
When I'm driving it, I feel young again.
My main worry is what happens to petrol availability when we've all gone electric.
Yikes... I’ve been keeping that thought at bay - I can remember watching the leaded pumps dissappear! I’ve been told that my next company car will be electric or hybrid :-O

On a positive (excuse the pun) note, the infrastructure isn’t there just yet, and battery technology is rubbish (but getting better fast...). Another 25 years of petrol though, which is how long I can go without a license retest? I doubt it. But apart from the lack of nice noises and smells, I won’t mind putting an electric motor under the bonnet if I get to keep driving my classic. I’m sure there will be a time fairly soon when such conversions are not science fiction.

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Bradman.

ImageImage

Current classic cars: 1974 Triumph Dolomite (Honey), 1978 Triumph Dolomite Sprint (Holly)
Current modern cars: 2003 BMW Z4 roadster 3.0 (Marty), 2010 Mini One (Rusty), 2018 VW Touran (Jack Sparrow)
Past classic cars: 1972 Triumph Spitfire IV with 2.0 I6 (Polly), 1972 Ford Escort 1100L with RS2000 running gear (Nora Batty)


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PostPosted: Mon Nov 19, 2018 10:34 pm 
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A sort of update to my above post.
Saturday we headed off in the Toledo towards Suffolk via Essex and Diss....
Gill, my long-suffering wife, commented on how relaxed the car was as we zipped up the motorway at 85. She reckoned it felt very good, unstressed and the only downside was wind noise from the front windows.

We stayed with friends afer various visits, and Sunday did the CT navigational rally, some sections were on very bumpy surfaces, but the car behaved impeccably. We came 4th, not too far off the winners (couple of small errors plus a driver who missed a few codeboards....)

We them travelled to Cromer to stay with friends, and today travelled back in pretty awful weather. But we made VERY good progress, and the Michelin Crossclimates again proved to be very capable tyres (smallest size is 14" though). I reckon we averaged around 35mpg over the nearly 500 miles covered. 2 small issues. Te fuel pump gasket seems to be the source of an oil leak, must replace that. And the starter needs to come out to fix the occasional inability to start. I think it is the connections inside the solenoid, it clicks but won't even attempt to spin, but usually will go after numerous attempts, then is fine for ages....

Maybe the car will live longer than I thought if it continues to behave so well :D

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Clive Senior
Brighton
Driving Toledo fitted with slant 4, sprint OD box and axle. Needs fettling!


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 Post subject: Aye...
PostPosted: Tue Nov 20, 2018 9:46 am 
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Location: Caithness, Scotland
Quote:
And the starter needs to come out to fix the occasional inability to start. I think it is the connections inside the solenoid, it clicks but won't even attempt to spin, but usually will go after numerous attempts, then is fine for ages....
This is a well known common problem which also affects Stags, Clive..

Tony Hart, the Stag specialist, sells a wiring kit to prevent this. Basically an external relay is used,
which how BL wired up Rover P6B starters.
I am going to wire up my Sprint's starter this way and will insulate it from the exhaust manifold heat too.


Ian.

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PostPosted: Tue Nov 20, 2018 9:54 am 
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Location: Ayrshire, Scotland
Well, I can't claim to be one of the younger drivers out there! But here's my history as regards interesting cars. Having had a couple of interesting cars when I was young and single, I restarted my hobby when I was in my forties and our boys were no longer babies. I bought a completely rust-wrecked MG Midget and spent piles of money and much time rebuilding it with my oldest son, who was about 13 at the time. That's the Damask one at the top left. I sold it after 2 or 3 years for the white MGB which was my daily transport for 12 years.

Then I bought for £250 the blue MGB GT, which was another rusted-out wreck. Six years later it was on the road as a 3.9 litre V8. I still have this car after 16 years and it has covered 33,000 miles in ten years and has been all over the UK and in France, It has cost me a LOT more than it is worth were I to sell it. I bought the MGF to fill in while the B was being built. It didn't need much work and was a nice car to drive, but terrible for the home mechanic to work on. That was sold at a loss when the V8 was ready.

The blue Midget was a whim and was bought dismantled with a new Heritage shell. Having built it up to a nice car, I decided I was getting a bit old for struggling in to it, and for putting up with the low gearing, so it was sold on, just about breaking even on what I spent on it. The Midget is fine for a blat round the lanes but is a trial on long trips, and from Scotland most trips are long.

Then I was offered the Elan Sprint, again completely dismantled with a new chassis. That was a most interesting build and turned out very well, although the struggles I had with things like the electric windows were not fun. Once finished, I realised that I was sitting on a valuable car, so it was sold and is the only car I have ever made any money on - quite a lot of money as it happens. Some of th comments I made about the Midget also apply to the Elan. Fabulous racing car for the road, but noisy and tiring on a long trip.

The Dolomite 1850HL was my brother-in-law's car, bought by him when it was 3 years old. It had lain for 26 years in his dry garage in Aberdeen and it was gifted to me for nothing. The body only required minimal repair and a repaint. The mechanics were treated to new rings and shells, new brakes and suspension, a new radiator, and the fitment of an overdrive gearbox. So far it has only driven about 350 miles since the recommission, but it goes well and is surprisingly comfortable.

The Z3 was another whim purchased last year. I love the smooth six cylinder engine, although it hasn't been trouble-free. I think (hope) I have ironed out most of the problems, which were mostly electrical.

My problem is I only have a small double garage. If one of the cars is being worked on, as one of them frequently is, the other two have to live outdoors in Troon's wet climate. My V8 is showing signs of this treatment after 10 years of use and could do with a repaint. It's crazy to have three toy cars but I don't know which one I should get rid of. They are all nice cars in their own ways.

By the way, I am not super rich, having been a health service lab scientist, but I did get a small inheritance when my parents died and have been carefully using that. Selling the Elan helped a lot. I also have a super understanding wife, God bless her. To answer the original poster's question, I have the cars because I like them. I don't wrap them up in cotton wool, but use them all year in all weathers. They are certainly not investments (except the Elan).


Attachments:
Classics Nov 2018 small.jpg
Classics Nov 2018 small.jpg [ 162.74 KiB | Viewed 279 times ]

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Mike
(MGB GTV8, BMW Z3 2.2, and Dolomite 1850HL)
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 Post subject: Re: Aye...
PostPosted: Tue Nov 20, 2018 10:50 am 
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Joined: Sun Oct 26, 2008 7:26 am
Posts: 1921
Quote:
Quote:
And the starter needs to come out to fix the occasional inability to start. I think it is the connections inside the solenoid, it clicks but won't even attempt to spin, but usually will go after numerous attempts, then is fine for ages....
This is a well known common problem which also affects Stags, Clive..

Tony Hart, the Stag specialist, sells a wiring kit to prevent this. Basically an external relay is used,
which how BL wired up Rover P6B starters.
I am going to wire up my Sprint's starter this way and will insulate it from the exhaust manifold heat too.


Ian.
So a relay to take the load off the starter/ignition switch? That may do it. I had assumed dirty/burnt contacts inside the starter solenoid.
I will have a look when I get the chance. It does seem to be very intermittent. Thankfully never an issue on the RBRR (though we always parked where we could easily bump start, just in case!)

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Clive Senior
Brighton
Driving Toledo fitted with slant 4, sprint OD box and axle. Needs fettling!


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PostPosted: Tue Nov 20, 2018 6:23 pm 
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Location: Huntingdon
My plans are to drive my Sprint as fast as I can whenever I can and to generally get an even worse reputation as a hooligan and menace on the road. And whilst doing that I plan to try and keep the Sprint looking reasonable and mechanically well maintained until I can no longer maintain it myself, which I'm really hoping will be a long time away, and at that point who knows. I've also got a stinker of an 1850, not sure what I am doing with that long term other than getting it on the road and maybe use it to take the strain off the Sprint or let someone else become it's guardian.

Related but not related, a 1970's Range Rover converted to electric power, interesting video (and channel, complete with 'Kryten' as the host) to watch on EV overall:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IGjOY4JBmy4

_________________
Current fleet: Triumph Dolomite Sprint '75, Daihatsu Fourtrak, Honda CG125, Yamaha Fazer 600, Shetland 570

Disposal fleet: Golf GTi 16v MK3 Anniversary

Past fleet: Triumph 2000, Lancia Beta Coupe, BL Mini Clubman, Austin Metro, Vauxhall Cavalier MK1 & MK2, Renault 18 D, Rover 216 GSI, Honda Accord (most expensive car purchase, hated it on pickup from dealer, was made out of magnetic metal as only car I've ever been crashed into, 4 times), Golf GTi MK3 16v x 3


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PostPosted: Tue Nov 20, 2018 6:52 pm 
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Quote:
My plans are to drive my Sprint as fast as I can whenever I can and to generally get an even worse reputation as a hooligan and menace on the road.
I like that :twisted: :suntan:

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Clive Senior
Brighton
Driving Toledo fitted with slant 4, sprint OD box and axle. Needs fettling!


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PostPosted: Fri Nov 23, 2018 4:28 pm 
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Joined: Tue Oct 13, 2009 5:16 pm
Posts: 11
Location: Leicester
Hi
Bought My Sprint in 1986, used as a daily driver until 1998
2 no fault bumps within 6 months then taught me that I valued her too much to continue using it everyday in all weathers
Garaged her and bought different daily driver
With the old girl on SORN, I Started refurbishment and light restoration.....taking a bit longer than planned
She has survived marriage, Kids, moving house, divorce, 3 job changes and 5 other daily drivers
Now that I have the time it is full on to get her back in one, good, working piece and back on the road.

Then it will be relaxed, warm dry summer days only until I bequeath her to some deserving individual, either that or be buried in her!

After 30+ years we are a pair and that is my long term plan


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