The Triumph Dolomite Club - Discussion Forum

The Number One Club for owners of Triumph's range of small saloons from the 1960s and 1970s.
It is currently Thu Feb 25, 2021 4:16 am

All times are UTC




Post new topic  Reply to topic  [ 7 posts ] 
Author Message
 Post subject: Trailing arm refurb;...
PostPosted: Wed Jan 27, 2021 5:55 pm 
Offline
TDC Member

Joined: Sun Mar 16, 2008 2:52 pm
Posts: 2185
Hello All, One little job I've been doing is to refurbish my spare trailing arm. Now I've previously pressed the old rubber bushes out and wire-brushed it clean before I send it in for powder coating and in the area where they can break up I can see a line down the metal work . I think this is a pressing mark from where it was manufactured. But I'm not sure. I'd hate to have another broken one.
What do you think please ?
Thanks ,
Tony.


Attachments:
trailarm2.jpg
trailarm2.jpg [ 80.81 KiB | Viewed 201 times ]
Top
   
PostPosted: Wed Jan 27, 2021 6:50 pm 
Offline
Future Club member hopefully!
Future Club member hopefully!
User avatar

Joined: Mon Jun 03, 2013 4:48 pm
Posts: 1481
Looks like a stretch mark from the pressing, and thats not quite where they usually break its nearer the crease slightly to the right where its thinner.

How much are you normally charged for powder coating a part like that, I've been asked to blast and coat some similar parts but as i normally only do stuff for myself and friends I've no idea on how much is reasonable to charge?

_________________
Some people are like Slinky's, they serve no real purpose in life but bring a smile to your face when you push them down the stairs.


Top
   
PostPosted: Fri Jan 29, 2021 5:26 pm 
Offline
TDC Member

Joined: Sun Mar 16, 2008 2:52 pm
Posts: 2185
Hi Justyn, Thanks for that. The informal arrangement I had was that I would clean up the arm as far as possible before they quoted as the inner section of the pressing is difficult to clean out. The cleaning and prep; is half the battle.
I'll let you know how it goes.
Thanks for your opinion on the press-tool marks.
Tony.


Top
   
PostPosted: Fri Jan 29, 2021 9:59 pm 
Offline
TDC Member

Joined: Mon Dec 12, 2016 9:53 pm
Posts: 1143
Location: Harrow Middlesex
I would reinforce the Trailing arm

Dave


Top
   
PostPosted: Fri Jan 29, 2021 11:27 pm 
Offline
Future Club member hopefully!
Future Club member hopefully!

Joined: Mon Dec 03, 2012 6:04 pm
Posts: 1287
Quote:
I would reinforce the Trailing arm

Dave
I would be very careful about doing that, unless you really know what you're doing. If you make one part of a chain of parts stiffer of stronger, you move the point of failure elsewhere. The other issue is a badly done reinforcement will create a stress riser that will make a failure more likely.


Top
   
PostPosted: Sat Jan 30, 2021 1:35 am 
Offline
Future Club member hopefully!
Future Club member hopefully!

Joined: Wed Oct 23, 2013 7:10 pm
Posts: 707
Location: NORTH NOTTS
ideally these rear arms need complete make over using thicker material but keep same measurements so they look like for like....bl or leyland made on the cheap cheap 70`s teas up!

_________________
Dolomite 1300,1980`V`reg in british racing brown(russet),3.63 diff with 21t speedo pinion,95%poly`d,HL clocks,standard wheels with SE covers wrapt in 175 70 13,mot`d 19-09-2014,been off the since 1990,(july2017) stainless steel exhaust 3-piece,(xmas2018) wooden mountney steering wheel,(june2020) new monroe shock(radial front,gas-matic rears) with -1" lower`d springs all round.


Top
   
PostPosted: Sat Jan 30, 2021 7:16 pm 
Offline
TDC Shropshire Area Organiser

Joined: Sun Aug 21, 2011 4:12 pm
Posts: 6025
Location: Highley, Shropshire
Quote:
ideally these rear arms need complete make over using thicker material but keep same measurements so they look like for like....bl or leyland made on the cheap cheap 70`s teas up!

Yes i've seen cracked and broken trailing arms, who hasn't? But i've seen far more failures due primarily to corrosion than I have to overstrain and these seem to be, in the main, on track, or very hard road use cars, that have been polybushed throughout. I even took a busted (rotten) one off a 1500 auto recently, I can't think of a softer life than that in terms of strain! But rot is no respecter of model!

My own Carledo has probably some of the hardest worked trailing arms of any Dolomite anywhere, with 140odd horses on tap, frequent track work and, the REAL killer, lots of linelock controlled static burnouts on the dragstrip. The car only has Poly on the rear end of the trailing arms and the arms are the 73 originals (Ziebarted when new) I've not strengthened them and they are still in perfect shape.

So, once again, my advice is, if it ain't broke, don't fix it! Just check your arms now and again for rot! Getting them cleaned up and powder coated, as Tony is doing, is probably gonna go a long way to ensuring his arms have a long life. I also agree with cleverusername, if you stiffen that initial failure point, you don't cure the problem, you just move it somewhere else!

Steve

_________________
'73 2 door Toledo with Vauxhall Carlton 2.0 8v engine (The Carledo)
'78 Sprint Auto with Vauxhall Omega 2.2 16v engine (The Dolomega)
'72 Triumph 1500FWD in Slate Grey

Maverick Triumph, Servicing, Repairs, Electrical, Recomissioning, MOT prep, Trackerjack brake fitting service.
Apprentice served Triumph Specialist for 50 years. PM for more info or quotes.


Top
   
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic  Reply to topic  [ 7 posts ] 

All times are UTC


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Limited