The Triumph Dolomite Club - Discussion Forum

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PostPosted: Thu Mar 31, 2022 10:33 pm 
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Hi Triumph Dolomite Club Members!

It's Reece here, the better looking half of the GK Garages team!

As the title of this post alludes to, GK Garages (another chap called Ross, and I) have just signed up to take part in the absolute epic that is the 2023 Mongol Rally! This is an adventure that will take us from home in Bristol, over 10,000 miles through Europe (around the Nurburgring), down through Turkey, through Iran, and up into the 'Stans' before we hit Mongolia... and then we're going to drive back again! A 20,000 mile adventure that most people undertake by firmly sticking to the only two rules imposed by the organisers... Paying les than £1000 for your car, and having an engine smaller than 1000cc. The other aspect of this journey alongside the driving, is the fact we're raising money for charity! We've set ourselves the challenge or raising a minimum of £2000 to be split between our 3 charities: Cool Earth, Mind, and the RSPCA!

Here at GK Garages we're a little stupid, and so have taken it upon ourselves to do this challenge in a 1967 Triumph 1300 FWD that we've aptly named Stanley, as we're going to go and show him off in a bunch of the 'Stans'! The eagle eyed amongst you will know that a 1300 FWD is a 1296cc engine - however we've been given special dispensation by the event organisers due to the fact the car is older than both of our ages combined, and is currently 80% structural rust.

So why are we here?

Ross and I have quickly realised that as much as we love cars, and have worked on a fair few already - we need to source the knowledge of Triumph experts with regards to what we can do to firstly restore, and secondly modify our car so that it will not only survive the 20,000 miles - but thrive, and fly the British flag proudly across multiple continents and over 20 countries! Whilst we don't want to absolutely destroy our car, we are incredibly keen on turning him into an absolute classic rally monster with switches and dials, and all the other rally naughtiness inside!

So I'm starting this thread to help collect the absolute wealth of knowledge and experience that the members of the Triumph Dolomite Club must have on our little 1300 FWD. We want to know absolutely everything! Strengths, weaknesses, what we should change, what we should modify, how we can raise the ground clearance, what parts are shared with other cars, what parts we might need custom made etc. etc. We want to know it all!

We'll keep you updated with our progress with a few posts on the thread, but also on a blog which we've incorporated into our website here: GK Garages 2023 Mongol Rally and also on our Instagram page here: GK Garages Instagram

If you have a nose around that website link, you will find more info on the two of us, the route we're taking, and the charities that we're going to be raising money for! Whilst we're here first and foremost to gather information so that we will actually make the 20,000 mile journey - we'd be doing ourselves a disservice if we didn't kindly remind you that this is all for charity, any any support that you can offer us will be greatly appreciated! Whether it be donations to the charities, donations to our fuel fund, or donations of spare parts or knowledge - any way you can help us will be greatly appreciated! As a little bonus, if you do end up donating - we're going to be stickering the life out of our little car so are thinking of adding names/faces/logos of those that have helped us along the way!!

Also, at some point we're going to be going on decent shakedown drives across the UK to make sure all our resto-modding is going to plan - which would be a great excuse to come and meet some of you at events and get togethers! Something to work towards for sure!

I look forward to hearing all of your ideas regarding how we can bullet proof and fully rally spec our little Triumph 1300 FWD!! Poor Stanley doesn't know what he's in for just yet!

Cheers,

Reece


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PostPosted: Fri Apr 01, 2022 9:43 am 
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Hi Reece.

I lived in Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia for eight years, and still work for the Mongolian government.

If and when you get there and you need anything let me know, and we will see what we can do.

Cheers

Richard

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PostPosted: Fri Apr 01, 2022 9:52 am 
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Quote:
Hi Reece.

I lived in Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia for eight years, and still work for the Mongolian government.

If and when you get there and you need anything let me know, and we will see what we can do.

Cheers

Richard
Hi Richard,

Oh wow! What a small world we live in!! Thanks so much for the heads up! Will definitely let you know the plans for when we get there!

Cheers,
Reece


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PostPosted: Wed Apr 06, 2022 2:21 pm 
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Good luck with the challenge guys! It sounds great.

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PostPosted: Fri Aug 12, 2022 6:03 pm 
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Location: South Benfleet, Essex
I don’t claim any expertise in the details of modifying vehicles for rallying or off-road use, but fundamentally everything needs to be as robust & reliable as possible and operate at optimum efficiency!

When driving on mountain roads, especially in regions where there are no safety barriers (see documentary TV series, “The World’s Most Dangerous Roads”), it would be advisable to minimise the likelihood of complete brake failure! This implies that the braking system should be completely overhauled as a matter of course, but also that upgrading to a dual-circuit hydraulic system might also be prudent.

According to my second-hand, dog-eared freebie FWD Triumph 1300/1500 Autodata Car Repair Manual, the Triumph 1300 & 1300TC models were equipped with front disc brakes & rear drum brakes with a single hydraulic circuit, boosted by either a direct-acting servo or a single remote-acting servo. The afore-mentioned manual states that “a ‘Remote’ type brake servo is fitted to 1300TC versions and a ‘Direct-acting’ servo is fitted to the 1500 model”, but no mention is made of the 1300 version!

Upgrading a system that has a direct-acting servo should be relatively straightforward, but alternatively fitting either a double remote-acting servo unit or two single remote-acting servo units, in addition to substituting a dual-circuit master cylinder, should not be beyond the scope of the competent DIY mechanic cum automotive engineer. The ideal would probably be to somehow mimic the triangular-split system that was used on Volvo 240-Series cars.

https://www.volvoclub.org.uk/pdf/brochu ... vo1971.pdf

http://www3.telus.net/wireless/car/man1977/ch6.htm

Board index » The Triumph Dolomite Club » Dolomite-related [Start here!] » 1300 brake upgrades? and more

viewtopic.php?f=4&t=19058&hilit=1300+servo


Board index » The Triumph Dolomite Club » Restoration Projects » Looong term 1300.

viewtopic.php?f=19&t=21856&p=214293&hil ... vo#p214293


Board index » The Triumph Dolomite Club » Dolomite-related [Start here!] » single line brakes to tandem

viewtopic.php?f=4&t=22553

During the winter of 1988/89, I retro-fitted two single remote-acting servo units to my 1973 VW 1600 Type 2 motor-caravan, which already had a dual-circuit hydraulic system, but no servo assistance for the front disc brakes & rear drum brakes.

Home Forums > Help and Assistance > Bay Tech Clinic > Steering, Brakes & Suspension >
Retro-fitting remote-acting brake servos, Kunifer-10 pipework & silicone brake fluid


http://forums.kombiclub.com/threads/ret ... uid.22693/

If driving at night, ensure that you have the best possible headlights, plus supplementary lighting in the legally-prescribed locations for a 1967 vintage car, plus possibly a few on the roof for when you are driving off-road; not forgetting to fit the obligatory tell-tale warning lights. It might also be prudent to protect the lamp lenses, by retro-fitting stone-guards of some sort.

All this extra lighting will require substitution of one or more decent capacity alternators (preferably for a 24V or 36V commercial-vehicle electrical system; remembering to appropriately modify the Triumph 1300’s existing electrical system), in place of the original Lucas C40-1, 22A dynamo. My 1974 Triumph Toledo 1300 “HL Special” is fitted with a second-hand Lucas A133, 65A alternator that I salvaged from a Rover SD1, which necessitated fitting a longer V-belt. If there had been more clearance between the larger-diameter alternator and the lead-acid battery’s front clamp, I could have used a slightly longer V-belt, which would have given better access to the No. 1 spark plug.

My V-belt and alternator markings & specifications are:

V-belt markings: F.A.I. Auto – 10AV1113 Goodyear

Alternator markings: Y in a circle, followed by 24125D | A133 – 65 | 198312V1

Alternator housing diameter: 141 mm

You might or might not be aware, that in the past, there has been at least one 4WD – four-wheel-drive, Triumph 1300 rally car, with potentially improved capability to cope with rough terrain, especially on loose or squishy surfaces. Torque-biasing or limited-slip differentials would also be useful, if one can find a source for this vehicle, with either FWD – front-wheel-drive or 4WD – four-wheel-drive. The four-wheel drive system was derived from the Pony, a vehicle which utilised a Triumph 1300 based transmission and possibly other components.

Malcolm McKay, “Buyer’s guide: Triumph 1300, 1500 & Toledo”, 25th July 2018

https://www.classicandsportscar.com/fea ... 500-toledo

https://www.classicandsportscar.com/fea ... 500-toledo

« The model’s sporting stardom came with a clever 4x4 adaptation using 2000 rear suspension and a Weber-carburetted motor. It wiped the board in its first televised outing in rallycross, but shortly after was rolled, and no more were made. »

« A small 4x4 off-road vehicle, the Pony, was also developed using 1300 running gear; it would eventually be built by Autocars in Israel. »


Having heavier-duty suspension components, would probably be beneficial. Where possible, it might be prudent to retro-fit sturdy skid plates, to protect vulnerable underside areas of the engine, transmission & suspension. Recalling that the FWD Triumph 1300 uses Rotoflex joints (i.e. rubber doughnuts), I would be inclined to upgrade from these to proper steel CVJs – constant velocity joints, which is now the recommended upgrade for one of the Lotus car models, as featured on Wheeler Dealers, presented by Mike Brewer & Edward China.

Once one travels far beyond the confines of Western Europe, the quality of road surfaces is likely to diminish significantly, with a significant proportion of poorly-surfaced or unsurfaced roads; possibly including razor-sharp flints or other hazards that might damage wheels and/or tyres.

I know that in some parts of the World it is not unusual to incur at least one puncture during a single day’s driving. One of my local acquaintances told me recently, that he had incurred three punctures during a single journey, whilst driving on the A1 highway in England. He now carries a set of four spare-wheels & tyres in both his cars!

Hence it would be advisable to carry at least two spare wheels & tyres, plus maybe a few inner-tubes, puncture-repair kit and a set of tyre levers. It would also be advisable to have a large, thick plywood board (maybe a circular one, forming a lid to the original spare-wheel & tyre) to support the lifting-jack on soft ground.

I am aware that one tyre company (Nokian in Finland I believe!?!), recently introduced Kevlar reinforced all-terrain tyres, but I don’t whether they are available in sizes suitable for Triumph 1300 standard 13 inch steel wheels. They are certainly available in sizes suitable for the 7 x 16 inch Mercedes C-Class wheels that I shall be fitting to my 1973 VW Type 2.

One “upgrade” which would contribute to raising the car’s ground clearance, would be to substitute larger-diameter wheels and tyres of larger external-diameter. However, the challenge would be to source wheels having the required fixing-stud PCD – pitch circle diameter and wheel-offset, that would be compatible with the FWD Triumph 1300; about which there has already been much discussion pertaining to Triumph Toledos & Dolomites.

Triumph Torque › Chit Chat Boards › Technical Chit-Chat › Triumph PCD & Suitable Wheels

http://club.triumph.org.uk/cgi-bin/foru ... 197304398/

Board index » The Triumph Dolomite Club » Dolomite-related [Start here!] » wheel sizes PCD?

viewtopic.php?f=4&t=18366

Board index » The Triumph Dolomite Club » Dolomite-related [Start here!] » Looking for different wheels? A warning!

https://forum.triumphdolomite.co.uk/vie ... =4&t=37338

Board index » The Triumph Dolomite Club » Dolomite-related [Start here!] » MG-Rover-Austin Maestro or Montego alloy wheels for Triumph Toledo & Dolomite

https://forum.triumphdolomite.co.uk/vie ... =4&t=34572

Board index » The Triumph Dolomite Club » Dolomite-related [Start here!] » MGF WHEELS

viewtopic.php?f=4&t=33153

Board index » The Triumph Dolomite Club » Dolomite-related [Start here!] » Dolomite Sprint Tyres

https://forum.triumphdolomite.co.uk/vie ... =4&t=37285

Some Triumph Dolomite Club forum members, have recently indicated that they habitually wear out tyres after ridiculously low mileages (as little as 4,000 miles!), but whether this is attributable to their choice of tyres and/or where & how they drive, is still a matter of contention!

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Uniform_T ... ty_Grading

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Uniform_T ... #Treadwear

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tire_code#Wear_rating

Noting that batteries, starter-motors & starter-motor circuits are normally reliable, until they cease to be reliable with little or no advance warning, retro-fitment of a hand-cranked, engine starting-handle facility, might be a useful backup when travelling in sparsely populated areas with little traffic. I have had one of these on my 1973 VW Type 2’s air-cooled engine since the late-1980s; having grown up with my father’s late-1940s vintage Morris 8 Series E, which had this facility as standard! The Citroën 2CVs were still so equipped when production ended in the early-1990s.

Board index » The Triumph Dolomite Club » Dolomite-related [Start here!] » Toledo With Starting Handle

https://forum.triumphdolomite.co.uk/vie ... =4&t=25537

Ideally reinforce the car’s unitary-frame construction, by seam-welding or at least brazing, every single spot welded seam, to minimise concentration of the stresses. There might be areas where it would be useful to weld-in additional reinforcement buttresses, gussets or flitch-plates; especially at less than or equal to 90º angle joints between adjoining panels and/or components.

Whilst you are sorting out the “80% structural rust”, it would seem to be the most appropriate time to do this, as much of the vehicle would need repainting afterwards anyway; preferably in one or more high-visibility colours (e.g. high-saturation orange, yellow and/or yellow-green) which are the most easily seen colours in any weather, under both daytime & night-time conditions! Avoid using any colours (especially white, silver & grey, plus any pastel colours) which offer poor contrast with the background terrain or sky. Red is highly visible in daytime, but under low-light-intensity dawn & dusk and night-time conditions, it appears black.

Once you drive outside Great Britain or Sweden, the likelihood of being involved in a vehicle collision, increases significantly (sometimes more than 10 fold!) and not merely because in some of the countries, people drive on the left, centre or right hand sides of the road dependent upon how they feel at the time, whilst you are diligently obeying the local rules of driving on the right.

Many people do other crazy things which increase the likelihood of collisions, which one seldom witnesses in Great Britain or Sweden; some of which I have seen whilst travelling overseas in second-world & third-world countries! In 1970, in Turkey, which straddles the boundary between Europe & Asia, I witnessed people driving the centre of the road and saw bald tyres which were worn down to the textile reinforcement cords.

In Albania in 1967, where private-car ownership was NOT permitted, the public-transport buses and the few “tourist” coaches had flaps of rubber hanging off the sidewalls of the tyres. In the Baltic States (Lithuania, Latvia & Estonia) in 1993, vehicle condition & maintenance was not much better. The “tourist” coach in which we travelled back from Vilnius in Lithuania to St. Petersburg in Russia kept breaking down on an almost daily basis and when I had the opportunity to peer into the rear engine compartment, I observed coolant-system hoses and V-belts, that would probably soon fail at the least provocation.

If you are going to subject your car’s drivetrain and electrical system close to their limits, then it would be wise to retro-fit some supplementary instrumentation and modify the factory-standard ammeter circuit, so that it actually registers battery charging & discharging.

Here are some of my own thoughts which I have so far posted on what I regard as useful upgrades to a RWD 1973 Triumph Toledo 1300, which is closely related to a FWD Triumph 1300:

Board index » The Triumph Dolomite Club » Dolomite-related [Start here!] » 40+ Years With A 1974 Triumph Toledo 1300 “HL Special”

viewtopic.php?f=4&t=29933


Board index » The Triumph Dolomite Club » The Public Bar - General Chat » “Factory-Standard, Alternative & Supplementary Instruments”

viewtopic.php?f=5&t=29524


Board index » The Triumph Dolomite Club » Dolomite-related [Start here!] » Customising Lucas 60 mm, 8-Segment, Warning-Light Clusters

viewtopic.php?f=4&t=29490


Board index » The Triumph Dolomite Club » Dolomite-related [Start here!] » Triumph Toledo / Dolomite, Front & Rear Window, Wiper & Washer Upgrades

https://forum.triumphdolomite.co.uk/vie ... =4&t=37150


Board index » The Triumph Dolomite Club » Dolomite-related [Start here!] » Improving Heating, Ventilation, Demisting & Defrosting

https://forum.triumphdolomite.co.uk/vie ... =4&t=36917


Board index » The Triumph Dolomite Club » Dolomite-related [Start here!] » Substituting a Triumph Dolomite 1500 HL Engine Cooling-System Radiator into a Triumph Toledo 1300

https://forum.triumphdolomite.co.uk/vie ... =4&t=36892


Board index » The Triumph Dolomite Club » Dolomite-related [Start here!] » Exterior rear-view mirrors: which were factory standard; door or wing mounted?

https://forum.triumphdolomite.co.uk/vie ... =4&t=34789

If I were contemplating participating in this or any other International rallies, I would probably choose to use my extensively modified, 1973 VW “1600” Type 2 Westfalia Continental motor-caravan (with 1911 cm³ displacement, 90+ horsepower, 1972 VW 412LE based, VW Type 4 style air-cooled engine), which as well as having on-board living accommodation, is inherently more robust and better able to cope than my 1974 Triumph Toledo 1300 “HL Special”, with high or low ambient temperatures, unmade roads and off-road conditions.

Although my father paid £1,450 for this second-hand 1973 model-year VW Type 2 in January 1975, you probably could NOT buy one these days in factory-standard form for less than £15,000, and I have seen significantly higher asking prices on more than a few occasions. Even the original factory-fitted 1584 cm³ displacement, 50 horsepower, 1973 VW 1600 Type 1 Beetle style air-cooled engine, would probably exclude its acceptance for the Mongol rally.

The 1968~79 VW Type 2, was in its time, at the forefront of commercial van & minibus technology and to the best of my knowledge, was the only one with fully-independent front & rear suspension, whose ruggedness and low un-sprung weight, made it the vehicle of choice, for expeditions over any rough terrain, where all-wheel drive was not required; especially if one had the factory-fitted, limited slip differential option (M220).

In fact, a journey by Harry B. Coleman & Peggy Larson, in a VW Type 2 campervan, during 20th August 1976 to 20th April 1978, through 113 countries, over a distance of 231,288 km (i.e. 143,716 miles), holds the World record (see Guinness Book of Records, 1996, Page 119), for the longest continuous motor-caravan journey.

Another couple, who undertook a World tour, of about two thirds this distance, in a 1972 VW 1700 Type 2 motor-caravan (looks as though it might be a North American specification, Westfalia campervan, with a British Weathershields elevating roof!), wrote a book of advice for independent World travellers (see Theresa & Jonathan Hewat, "Overland and Beyond", Roger Lascelles, 5th Edition, 1981), during their 143,305 km (89,045 miles) journey, which crossed the International Date Line on Friday, 21st March 1975 and crossed the equator on four separate occasions, travelling through Europe, Africa, Asia and Europe, plus Central, North & South America.

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Independent tutor of mathematics, physics, technology & engineering, for secondary, tertiary, further & higher education.

https://www.linkedin.com/profile/view?id=308177758

Upgraded 1974 Triumph Toledo 1300 (Toledo / Dolomite HL / Sprint hybrid)

Onetime member + magazine editor & technical editor of Volkswagen Type 2 Owners' Club


Last edited by naskeet on Mon Aug 15, 2022 1:08 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Sun Aug 14, 2022 6:31 pm 
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I have no personal experience of the 1300fwd, but know they have a weak gearbox. I believe the club is having some parts made, or the 1500fwd box may be better, and slightly better geared.
And don't they use a rotoflex in the driveshaft? You will want the best available version, the cheap ones can have a rather short life.

Suspension, again no experience, but if shocks are interchageable with dolomite ones, then there are heavy duty springs available, or there may be some off the shelf "universal" springs from Faulkner? The other alternative is to make some spacers up. TR4s use them, from teh factory. Probably the wrong diameter, but easy to make on a lathe. Moss sell (or did) nylon versions for spitfires.

Lastly, I think there was a rally car or prototype 4wd Pony, based on a FWD I think. That may give you some ideas. (no, not the 4wd ideas, though Canleys may still have some of the gearboxes....)

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PostPosted: Sun Aug 14, 2022 8:23 pm 
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Keep it as std. as possible is my advice. Keep it as light as possible. Dual circuit brakes is wise to fit. In std form almost everything is repairable so best to keep it that way. Excotic suspension isn't needed. Keep all as soft and flexible as possible to have the suspension take the bangs and not the car's body or mounting points. Have an extra starter and alternator. Have a modern alternator, denso or similar to make it last. 100w bulbs in cibie 7 inch units will have enough light. have some spare wheelbearings and maybe one fronthub ready to fit.

A skidplate will do from 1cm alu plate. Going lighter or thinner you can leave it as it will do nothing other than collecting gravel. Fit another fuel tank, universal or something that fits, behind the rearseat. The safest place. One bump in the bootfloor and you have a leaky tank.

Change all botls and nuts by new ones. Less chanche of fatiguee and when needed to dismantle something you don't have a snapped 50 year old bolt what stops the game. caryy wire, ducttape, some bendable bars like used for concrete reinformcement, a lot of hoseclamps and exhaust clamps and enough ratchetstraps. Bars and exhaustclamps can make nice suspensionarms or driveshafts..

Oh, maybe I did mention it earlier but keep it as light as possible.

As for the tires, Kumho transport tyres you can use. Reinforced sidewalls 6 pley and very comfortable. Good in the wet also. Available in 155/13. The KC53 type.



Jeroen

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PostPosted: Mon Aug 15, 2022 1:03 pm 
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Joined: Tue May 06, 2014 4:38 pm
Posts: 535
Location: South Benfleet, Essex
Zone-Toughened or Laminated Windscreen!?!

Unless your 1967 FWD Triumph 1300 has sustained a broken windscreen during its circa 55 year life so far, it’s probably still got the original factory-fitted, zone-toughened windscreen, which are less susceptible to breakage than laminated windscreens, but when & if they do shatter, pose a significant safety hazard with regard to major reduction in forward visibility, as well as the very large number of potentially injurious glass fragments. Besides that, once broken, it would be extremely impractical, if not impossible, to continue one’s journey without first replacing the windscreen!

When my family and I travelled abroad with our 1973 VW 1600 Type 2 motor-caravan, which had a factory-fitted, zone-toughened windscreen, we carried an AA – Automobile Association, emergency roll-up plastic windscreen , with integral steel reinforcement bars, but I doubt whether these are still available.

https://www.bing.com/images/search?q=aa ... RE&first=1

AA Emergency Temporary Windscreen

https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/284835745752

https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/AA-Emergency ... 7675.l2557

AA Emergency Windscreen - Vintage Car Memorabilia - Brand new

https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/314107472773 ... 1124.m2109

AutoKing Emergency Windscreen - Heavy Duty Lined Plastic Sheeting with Plastic Pull Tags – Size 2050 mm x 1012 mm (i.e. 81” x 40”)

Image

For the Australian outback, some owners retro-fitted removable wire-mesh stone guards covering their VW Type 2 front windscreens, which are probably similar in form, to those fitted to the VW Type 2 minibuses that were used by the German riot police.

Audible Warning Signal

I don’t know how loud the horns are on a FWD Triumph 1300, which like those on a Triumph Toledo or Dolomite, are adequate for low-speed urban driving, but for high-speed highways, or bendy rural or mountain roads, would probably give inadequate warning until too late (especially in countries where drivers commonly risk overtaking on blind bends, which I have experienced in the past!), so you might want to retro-fit some decent fanfare air-horns or even roof-mounted truck horns, with a changeover switch. In some countries, including at least a few in Europe, it is obligatory to sound one’s horn when approaching blind bends or when overtaking!

The celebrated Arthur Barraclough, is said to have had five different types of horns for different conditions, on his much modified, 1970 VW “1600” Type 2 motor-caravan, in which he undertook a series of long-distance expeditions, covering a total of circa 217,000 miles, over a period of years or even decades, travelling around much of the World; through 57 countries, several major mountain ranges (including the Himalayas) and nine hot, arid deserts. I originally learned of Arthur and his vehicle, in two published magazine articles and briefly corresponded with him in early 1996, shortly before his death in August 1996, at the age of 82.

Bay Window Bus > Arthur Barraclough's, much vaunted, modified, 1970 VW Type 2

https://www.thesamba.com/vw/forum/viewt ... p?t=196043

Wheels & Tyres

Quote:
One “upgrade” which would contribute to raising the car’s ground clearance, would be to substitute larger-diameter wheels and tyres of larger external-diameter. However, the challenge would be to source wheels having the required fixing-stud PCD – pitch circle diameter and wheel-offset, that would be compatible with the FWD Triumph 1300; about which there has already been much discussion pertaining to Triumph Toledos & Dolomites.



When in May 1975, my father bought the ex-demonstrator, 1974 Triumph Toledo 1300, which I still have, it came fitted with 5½ x 13 inch Cosmic alloy wheels (21 mm wheel-offset) and Uniroyal Rallye 180, 175 SR13 (would be labelled as 175/80 R13 S these days) radial-ply tyres which would have been of about 5•6% larger external radius, diameter & circumference, than the 155 SR15 (i.e. 155/80 R13 S) radial-ply tyres fitted to the original factory-fitted 4 x 13 inch steel wheels.

Board index » The Triumph Dolomite Club » Dolomite-related [Start here!] » Looking for different wheels? A warning!

https://forum.triumphdolomite.co.uk/vie ... 15#p342266

https://forum.triumphdolomite.co.uk/vie ... 40#p342319

https://forum.triumphdolomite.co.uk/vie ... 83#p342783

https://forum.triumphdolomite.co.uk/vie ... 06#p342806


185/50 R14 tyres – predicted external radius = 270•29 mm (17•00 mm smaller than 175/70 R13)

185/45 R15 tyres – predicted external radius = 273•74 mm (13•85 mm smaller than 175/70 R13)

175/55 R14 tyres – predicted external radius = 274•04 mm (13•55 mm smaller than 175/70 R13)

185/60 R13 tyres – predicted external radius = 276•09 mm (11•00 mm smaller than 175/70 R13)

195/45 R15 tyres – predicted external radius = 278•24 mm (9•35 mm smaller than 175/70 R13)

175/65 R13 tyres – predicted external radius = 278•84 mm (8•75 mm smaller than 175/70 R13)


175/70 R13 tyres – predicted external radius = 287•59 mm


155/80 R13 tyres – predicted external radius = 289•09 mm (1•50 mm larger than 175/70 R13)

155/82 R13 tyres – predicted external radius = 292•19 mm (4•60 mm larger than 175/70 R13)

185/55 R15 tyres – predicted external radius = 292•24 mm (4•65 mm larger than 175/70 R13)

155/83 R13 tyres – predicted external radius = 293•74 mm (6•15 mm larger than 175/70 R13)

185/70 R13 tyres – predicted external radius = 294•59 mm (7•00 mm larger than 175/70 R13)

185/60 R15 tyres – predicted external radius = 301•49 mm (13•90 mm larger than 175/70 R13)

175/80 R13 tyres – predicted external radius = 305•09 mm (17•50 mm larger than 175/70 R13)

175/82 R13 tyres – predicted external radius = 308•59 mm (21•00 mm larger than 175/70 R13)

175/83 R13 tyres – predicted external radius = 310•34 mm (22•75 mm larger than 175/70 R13)

195/55 R16 tyres – predicted external radius = 310•44 mm (22•85 mm larger than 175/70 R13)

185/65 R15 tyres – predicted external radius = 310•74 mm (23•15 mm larger than 175/70 R13)

As well as giving an increase in ground clearance of about 16½ mm, in changing from 155 SR13 to 175 SR13 tyres, the larger external-radius 175 SR13 tyres, also gave about 10% improvement in fuel-economy, owing to the modest change in overall-effective engine gearing.

For reasons of wishing to use a slightly-lower-profile tyre, combined with the desire to revert to a larger external-radius compared to 155 SR13 or 185/70 R13 tyres, and the predicted long-term decline in availability and increase in relative cost of tyres for 13 inch wheels, I have elected in the future, to replace my current set of five 5½ x 13 inch Dolomite Sprint alloy wheels (35 mm wheel-offset) and Firestone S211, 185/70 R13 radial-ply tyres, with a set of six 5½ x 15 inch MG 2000 Maestro alloy wheels (31 mm wheel-offset) and probably 185/65 R15 radial-ply tyres, which have virtually the same external-radius as the “original” 175 SR13 tyres.

The following gear-ratio calculator, concurs with my assertion that using a 3•89:1 final-drive ratio in conjunction with 155 SR13 standard-profile tyres (said to be 82~83% aspect-ratio) or 185/55 R15 tyres, is almost exactly equivalent to using a 4•11:1 final-drive ratio in conjunction with 175 SR13 standard-profile tyres (said to be 82~83% aspect-ratio) or 185/65 R15 tyres.

https://tiresize.com/gear-ratio-calculator/

Now that I have the Triumph 1500TC Automatic rear axle with 3•89:1 final-drive ratio (or so I’ve been told) available as an option, the use of 185/65 R15 tyres is less critical with regard to overall engine gearing and associated average fuel economy, but I am still wary of using particularly low-profile tyres with reference to ride-comfort and susceptibility to tyre & wheel damage from kerbs, potholes, speed-humps and general road debris on supposedly well surfaced roads, yet alone poorly-surfaced & unsurfaced roads or bulldozed tracks, such as we encountered in Iceland in 1971.

In one of the discussions on The Samba forum about tyres, for the all-wheel-drive, 1985~92 VW Transporter T3 Syncro, it was said that 65-Series tyres have probably the lowest profile one should consider fitting to a vehicle that is sometimes used off-road. I have also read somewhere, that 65-Series tyres, have probably the lowest profile with which one can use inner-tubes.

Dependent upon what overall engine gearing and ground clearance you want to achieve, you potentially have the “option” of using 13 inch, 14 inch or 15 inch wheels, with a choice of tyre aspect ratios, subject to availability.

Two-Wheel-Drive or Four-Wheel-Drive?

Quote:
You might or might not be aware, that in the past, there has been at least one 4WD – four-wheel-drive, Triumph 1300 rally car, with potentially improved capability to cope with rough terrain, especially on loose or squishy surfaces. Torque-biasing or limited-slip differentials would also be useful, if one can find a source for this vehicle, with either FWD – front-wheel-drive or 4WD – four-wheel-drive. The four-wheel drive system was derived from the Pony, a vehicle which utilised a Triumph 1300 based transmission and possibly other components.



You might want to read the following to find out some more about the possibility of creating a part-time four-wheel-drive Triumph 1300; which would certainly improve the car’s off-road capability. If it were not for the cost & complexity of the conversion, plus the likely fuel-consumption penalty (mitigated to some extent, by having lockable freewheeling hubs), I wouldn’t mind converting my 1974 Triumph Toledo 1300 “HL Special” to four-wheel-drive; having often driven my father’s 1986 Ford Sierra XR4x4 (with optional ABS & air-conditioning, plus rear head restraints which I retro-fitted), before it got stolen twice from the driveway in 2007.

However, these part-time four-wheel drive systems, such as those found on the Triumph Pony and Series 2 Land Rover are NOT designed for use on hard surfaced roads like concrete or bitumen (i.e. asphalt or “tarmac”), which can result in a phenomenon known as “transmission windup”, which can potentially damage the drive train. They are solely intended for use on soft, squishy, loose or slippery surfaces. To create a full-time all-wheel-drive vehicle, one would need a central differential, like the FF – Furgason Formula used on the Jensen Interceptor FF, which was developed for use on the 1985~92 VW Transporter T3 Syncro, by Steyr-Daimler-Puch in Austria.

Pony 4WD Gearbox

https://www.canleyclassics.com/?product ... wd-gearbox

« Ever fancied building yourself a 4WD Triumph using all genuine Triumph bits? »

« Can't be done I hear you say, oh yes it can! We have a few factory new old stock complete Pony gearboxes. »

« If you didn't know what a Pony (or Autocars Dragoon) was read on: »

« The Pony was a 4WD utility vehicle built by Triumph utilising 1300 FWD derived components. What you get looks like a 1300 FWD gearbox with a bit tacked on the back and a few extra levers. The bit tacked on the back is the transfer box which would be connected to a conventional prop. The extra levers control the switchable 2WD/4WD, and low, and high ratio. »

« The best car to start with as a basis for this project would be 1500 FWD, correct subframe but retains a propshaft tunnel. At the rear you would bolt in a conventional Dolomite axle and connect it via prop to the transfer box. A bit of tin work with the gearbox tunnel and away you go. OK there's a little more to it than that, but it’s do-able. »

« Part No. . . . . . Description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Price . . . . . . . Units . . . . . Availability »

« SSO19 . . . . . . Pony 4WD Gearbox-Transaxle . . . . . £325•00 . . . . . Each . . . . . In Stock »


The extra levers for changing back & forth between two-wheel-drive & four-wheel-drive and between high-range & low-range, reminds me of the yellow-knobbed and red-knobbed levers used for this purpose in a Series 2 Land Rover, in which we travelled overland in circa 1968, from England to Morocco with travel-company “Safari”. Unless there is an overlap between the various overall gearing ratios, this would effectively give one eight forward gears and two reverse gears. What isn’t stated, is whether it is FWD or RWD, when in two-wheel-drive mode, or can one configure the system either way during installation!?!

Board index » The Triumph Dolomite Club » Dolomite-related [Start here!] » Advice on 8 point rule

https://forum.triumphdolomite.co.uk/vie ... =4&t=36355

https://forum.triumphdolomite.co.uk/vie ... 55#p334439

Board index » The Triumph Dolomite Club » Dolomite-related [Start here!] » strength of Pony awd box

https://forum.triumphdolomite.co.uk/vie ... =4&t=30494

Board index » The Triumph Dolomite Club » Dolomite-related [Start here!] » Triumph 1300s & 4WD Pony Boxes

https://forum.triumphdolomite.co.uk/vie ... =4&t=27015

Board index » The Triumph Dolomite Club » Dolomite-related [Start here!] » AWD dolomite

https://forum.triumphdolomite.co.uk/vie ... =4&t=29850

Unsurfaced-Road & Off-Road Driving

If you have had little if any experience so far, of driving on loose-gravel roads, unsurfaced roads or off-road, it would be wise to take some special-stage rally driving courses before embarking on the 2023 Mongol Rally.

I don’t have any rally driving experience on either surfaced roads or off-road special stages, but in 1980, I spent a few weeks driving on loose-gravel roads and potholed & rutted laterite dirt roads, in South Africa, Botswana & Swaziland, driving a rear-wheel-drive, Nissan E20 based motor-caravan, having four-speed manual transmission with steering-column mounted gear change, similar to that of the 1975 Toyota Hiace Mk.1 which I had driven the previous year.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Toyota_HiAce

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Toyota_Hi ... 1967–1977)

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nissan_Caravan

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nissan_Ca ... 1973–1980)

Driving on the relatively steep, potholed & rutted laterite dirt roads, in the hills around Mbane, the principal town in Swaziland, wheel-spin on the loose surface, caused the vehicle to slew disconcertingly on the bends, close to the edge, which prompted me to constantly keep changing back and forth between 1st & 2nd gears, to climb the hills, trying to maintain traction and minimise the incidence of wheel-spin. On that road, selectable four-wheel-drive would have been very useful!

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Upgraded 1974 Triumph Toledo 1300 (Toledo / Dolomite HL / Sprint hybrid)

Onetime member + magazine editor & technical editor of Volkswagen Type 2 Owners' Club


Last edited by naskeet on Thu Aug 18, 2022 7:45 pm, edited 2 times in total.

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PostPosted: Mon Aug 15, 2022 4:38 pm 
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Quote:
As for the tires, Kumho transport tyres you can use. Reinforced sidewalls 6 pley and very comfortable. Good in the wet also. Available in 155/13. The KC53 type.

Jeroen

When Jeroen refers to "transport tyres", I suspect he means either "commercial-van", "light-truck", "reinforced" or "extra-load" tyres. If one trawls the Internet, there are various links for 155 R13C tyres, with a load index of 90/88 and typically a speed-rating of N, Q, R or T.

According to the following link, the Kumho Portran KC53 commercial-van summer tyres, are of 8-ply rating:

Kumho Portran KC53 155R13C 90/88R 8PR

https://www.roundtriptyres.co.uk/kumho- ... r-8pr.html

Before spending vast sums of money on five, six or more new tyres, it would be wise to first decide what sized wheels you are going to use.

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Independent tutor of mathematics, physics, technology & engineering, for secondary, tertiary, further & higher education.

https://www.linkedin.com/profile/view?id=308177758

Upgraded 1974 Triumph Toledo 1300 (Toledo / Dolomite HL / Sprint hybrid)

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PostPosted: Mon Aug 15, 2022 7:45 pm 
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Nigel, we don't want a lock on this thread also.

Jeroen

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PostPosted: Thu Aug 18, 2022 7:42 pm 
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Quote:
Nigel, we don't want a lock on this thread also.

Jeroen
I hope not either!

There are so many things of which young novices need to be aware, preparing and/or driving "rally cars" off-road, or on various road surfaces, under a variety of road, traffic & weather conditions. I have travelled on some terrible roads on various continents in the past, either as a driver or passenger. As the British saying goes, "failing to prepare is preparation to fail", so I didn't wish to "leave any stone unturned", in providing information or advice; keeping in mind my own ignorance of certain things.

There will doubtless be people who have conflicting or differing opinions on what best to do! :|

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PostPosted: Fri Aug 26, 2022 7:03 pm 
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Two-Wheel-Drive or Four-Wheel-Drive?
Quote:
You might or might not be aware, that in the past, there has been at least one 4WD – four-wheel-drive, Triumph 1300 rally car, with potentially improved capability to cope with rough terrain, especially on loose or squishy surfaces. Torque-biasing or limited-slip differentials would also be useful, if one can find a source for this vehicle, with either FWD – front-wheel-drive or 4WD – four-wheel-drive. The four-wheel drive system was derived from the Pony, a vehicle which utilised a Triumph 1300 based transmission and possibly other components.

A few days ago, I discovered a very-recently resurrected thread on the Resto Rides forum, dating from November 2017, about building a four-wheel drive Triumph 1300 in The Netherlands, by Steve G who bought a Triumph Pony transmission from Canley Classics about four years ago, and now has a FWD Triumph 1300 to convert. It will be interesting to learn how he progresses with it!?!

https://forum.retro-rides.org/thread/20 ... h-1300-4wd


Wheels & Tyres
Quote:
One “upgrade” which would contribute to raising the car’s ground clearance, would be to substitute larger-diameter wheels and tyres of larger external-diameter. However, the challenge would be to source wheels having the required fixing-stud PCD – pitch circle diameter and wheel-offset, that would be compatible with the FWD Triumph 1300; about which there has already been much discussion pertaining to Triumph Toledos & Dolomites.

From what I have read in the following topic threads, sourcing alternative substitute wheels, with appropriate wheel-offset for a FWD Triumph 1300 with 4 x 3¾ inches (i.e. 4 x 95•25 mm) PCD – pitch-circle diameter, appears to be considerably more difficult, than sourcing alternative substitute wheels for any other of the small Triumph cars; including the Herald, Vitesse, Spitfire, GT6, Toledo, Dolomite or Dolomite Sprint. I resisted the nagging temptation to correct the punctuation, spelling, grammar & sentence structure in the excerpts which follow:

Board index » The Triumph Dolomite Club » Dolomite-related [Start here!] » 1300 wheels alloys

https://forum.triumphdolomite.co.uk/vie ... =4&t=29400

« dose anyone know wot alloys fit a triumph 1300 fwd i seen a couple of cars in the mag and wot some for mine dose spitfire fit »

« as stated elsewhere, Sprint alloys will bolt on, BUT may foul the rear arches, and will make the steering bump steer, and sensitive to potholes etc. »

« The blue and green cars featured recently in Dolly Mixture are the alloys suitable for the Rover 100 series, these have virtuially the correct offset for the FWD, indeed the blue car runs a 3mm spacer on the front for top ball joint clearance. »



Board index » The Triumph Dolomite Club » Dolomite-related [Start here!] » 1300 fwd wheels and other problems

https://forum.triumphdolomite.co.uk/vie ... =4&t=22973

Gordon wrote:

« The only alloy wheels you could fit without any fouling problems would be ones intended for the Rover Metro/100, I know of at least one club member with these fitted and he doesn't report any problems. »



Board index » The Triumph Dolomite Club » Dolomite-related [Start here!] » Modified 1300 fwd's? are there any?

https://forum.triumphdolomite.co.uk/vie ... =4&t=21176

Steve wrote:

« AFAIK the massive inset on the fwd cars was only to compensate for the driveshaft length so the only real problem with fitting Sprint rims is concerned with wheel-arch clearance. The wheel bearing is exactly the same as fitted to the rear of mk2 Vitesse and GT6 cars which do not have the inset and carry much more power, where's the problem? Steve »

« PS check "today’s top spot" in general chat page 12 on Jan 1st 2012 for pics of what one looks like! S »



The major obstacle appears to be the FWD Triumph 1300’s particularly-large wheel offset (yet to be quantified, but easily measured and calculated), which is said to be even larger than those of the Triumph Toledo, Dolomite & Dolomite Sprint.

One “potential” donor of “potentially” suitable wheels, is said to be the 1994~98 Rover 100, that is stated to have either 4½J x 13 inch or 5½J x 13 inch wheels [factory-fitted with 155/65 R13 or 185/55 R13 tyres], having a 52 mm wheel-offset, 57•1 mm centre-bore diameter, 4 x 3¾ inches (i.e. 4 x 95•25 mm) PCD wheel-fixing holes and 12 mm diameter, M12 x 1•0 mm screw-studs [sturdier than the Triumph’s 9•525 mm diameter, 3/8 inch UNF screw-studs], which might be preferable on poorly-surfaced roads or off-road conditions.

https://www.wheel-size.com/size/rover/

https://www.wheel-size.com/size/rover/100/

https://www.wheel-size.com/size/rover/100/1994/

https://www.wheel-size.com/size/rover/100/1998/

These 1994~98 Rover 100 wheels of sizes 4½J x 13 inch or 5½J x 13 inch, are of the same rim width & diameter as the Triumph Dolomite and Dolomite Sprint wheels, but having a 52 mm wheel-offset rather than circa 35 mm; assuming the above quoted 52 mm wheel-offset specifications are accurate! It’s a pity that the Rover 100 wasn’t fitted with 14 inch or 15 inch wheels of these or similar specifications!

It was also interesting to note on the Wheel-Size.com website, that there are other Rover car models, including the Rover 800, which appear to use 5½ x 14 inch or 5½ x 15 inch wheels [factory-fitted with 195/70 R14 or 195/65 R15 tyres] of circa 50 mm wheel-offset, but they are NOT of 4 x 95•25 mm (i.e. 4 x 3¾ inches) PCD and their centre-bore diameters also seem to be larger.

https://www.wheel-size.com/size/rover/800/

I do not know, whether or not it would be practical & cost-effective, to either have bespoke front & rear wheel-hubs made, or modify the existing front & rear wheel-hubs, by boring four more stud-holes, between the existing four stud-holes, to mount wheels of a more commonly available PCD, such as 4 x 100 mm or 4 x 114•3 mm (i.e. 4 x 4½ inch).

On a long-distance rally or expedition, where there is a relatively high risk of needing to replace one or more damaged wheels, it would be comforting to know that common replacement wheels of an appropriate PCD & wheel-offset, were more readily obtainable at short notice, than the factory-standard, FWD Triumph 1300 wheels or the 1994~98 Rover 100 wheels, which is a modern car of limited production run, of which there are probably few examples remaining; owing to scrapapge of relatively modern cars (I regard any car first manufactured after 1990 as being modern!) with failing, complex electronic systems, which are uneconomical to repair.

Given my own past experience of trying to identify & source suitable, alternative substitute wheels for my 1974 Triumph Toledo 1300 “HL Special”, I would carefully measure all the original wheel & new-tyre (i.e. with unworn tread-depth) dimensions plus the existing wheel & tyre clearances on the FWD Triumph 1300, to determine how much leeway one has regarding the possible substitution of wheels having a different offset, plus tyres of greater section-width and/or external-radius.

Once that has been established, verify by actual observation, measurement and calculation as appropriate, the actual specifications of any wheels being offered for sale. From past experience, I know that wheel specifications given on Internet websites and on-line forums are fraught with inaccuracies; particularly with regard to PCD and wheel-offset! In the past, I have reviewed PCD and wheel-offset data for the 1971 VW Type 2 Transporter & 1980~92 VW Transporter T3 wheels on Carl Salter’s website link, which I know to be seriously incorrect, so I am wary of trusting any of his data!

https://www.carlsalter.com/rover-wheel-fitments.html

https://sizemywheels.com/pcd/rover

https://sizemywheels.com/pcd/rover/100

It took nearly two years of research (including interrogation of vendors re data embossed on the wheels and their own physical measurements made at my request), before I was confident that I had complete, reliable data about the MG 2000 Maestro and MG 2000 Montego alloy wheels, I was considering for substitution on my 1974 Triumph Toledo 1300 “HL Special”!

I bought one set of five MG 2000 Maestro 5½ x 15 inch alloy wheels (4 x 95•25 mm PCD & 31 mm wheel-offset), from Howard Floyd in Yorkshire, who had unwisely bought them for his own car, having been assured by the vendor that they would fit his 2003~2012 Citroen C2.

For my own interest and hopefully provide Howard with more reliable information, I looked up the wheel specifications for his car on the Internet, which indicated that they had a 4 x 108 mm PCD, a 65•1 mm centre-bore diameter and a circa 24~27 mm wheel-offset, for 5½ x 15 inch or 6 x 15 inch wheels, fastened with M12 x 1•25 mm wheel-bolts.

https://www.wheel-size.com/size/citroen/c2/

https://www.wheel-size.com/size/citroen/c2/2003/

https://www.wheel-size.com/size/citroen/c2/2012/

The moral of this story, is to be ever wary and don’t take advice or information at face value!

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Nigel A. Skeet

Independent tutor of mathematics, physics, technology & engineering, for secondary, tertiary, further & higher education.

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Upgraded 1974 Triumph Toledo 1300 (Toledo / Dolomite HL / Sprint hybrid)

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PostPosted: Sat Sep 03, 2022 6:39 pm 
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Driving in Dusty Conditions

If driving any significant distances off-road or on dirt roads or unsealed gravel / graded roads, it will be necessary to clean or replace the engine’s air-intake filter (typically a pleated-paper filter or oil-bath filter) at much more regular intervals, than is normally recommended for use on sealed-surface roads such as concrete or tarmac. In extreme cases, this might be necessary every few days or even every day, which is certainly mentioned in the owner’s operating manual for the 1973 VW 1600 & 1700 Type 2 Transporter T2. Owing to quantities of fine abrasive dust passing through the air filter into the engine, there would also be a need to change the oil and/or oil filter at more regular intervals.

Hence, it might be advisable to take a few extra spare air-filter elements & oil-filter cartridges, which would “normally” require changing at least once during a 20,000 mile journey. Given that it might be extremely difficult to source engine oil with appropriate additives for a classic car on route, it would be prudent to carry enough oil for at least two oil changes plus any top-ups necessitated by oil leakage and/or consumption

If using a semi-synthetic or fully-synthetic engine oil, which is very much less susceptible to oxidation & sludge-formation than conventional multi-grade mineral oil (as I have discovered from personal experience), it is possible to substantially increase the oil-drain intervals, by retro-fitting a supplementary fine-filtration, bypass oil filter as commonly used on heavy-goods vehicles, so that one has both full-flow coarse filtration and bypass-flow (i.e. partial-flow – typically 10~20%) fine filtration. One such bypass oil filter kit is, or at least was, available from Amsoil, but there might be other cheaper options. Magnetic filtration in various forms is also available, which might possibly be of benefit when travelling on laterite dirt roads.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Laterite

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dirt_road

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dirt_road ... rram_roads

Amsoil Bypass Filtration Kit

Image

Image

Bennett Fitch (Noria Corporation), “Magnetic Filtration Applications and Benefits”, Machinery Lubrication, September 2005

https://www.machinerylubrication.com/Re ... filtration

https://www.machinerylubrication.com/Meta/Topics

https://www.machinerylubrication.com/Me ... %20filters

https://www.machinerylubrication.com/Me ... tor%20oils

Magnom magnetic oil filtration – pre-filter canister unit

Image

Back in the mid-1980s, the recommended oil-drain interval was 1 year or 25,000 miles (whichever came first) for Mobil 1, SAE 5W/50, API SF, “Rally Formula” fully-synthetic engine oil, which I used with good results, in the water-cooled and air-cooled engines, of the 1974 Triumph Toledo 1300 “HL Special” and the 1973 VW 1600 Type 2 Transporter; albeit with substantially less than 25,000 mile drain intervals, owing to the limitations of the factory-standard oil-filtration systems.

Ideally, one would retro-fit a supplementary cyclone air pre-cleaner, if driving significant distances on dusty roads! In the following second installment of an article I wrote for the VWT2OC – Volkswagen Type 2 Owners’ Club bi-monthly magazine, I discussed alternative air filters that were available as either factory-fitted or dealership-fitted options, for territories where dusty conditions were an inherent problem, of which Australia and South Africa were two particular areas which warranted these options.

Nigel A. Skeet, "Replacement Parts & Touring Spares, for Volkswagen Transporters, Imported Second-Hand from Overseas - Part 2", Transporter Talk, Issue 112, April 2011, Pages 22~28.

In the article, I cited Philip Lander from Australia, who had a Nippon-Donaldson “Cyclopac” two-stage air-filter unit, that he had on his 1974 VW 1800 Type 2 with twin Solex carburettors. He informed me that VW of Australia had introduced this Japanese manufactured, Donaldson two-stage air cleaner (the first stage is probably a cyclone pre-cleaner of some description), following numerous engine rebuilds under warranty, as a consequence of these vehicles being driven on dirt roads, when equipped with the normal single-stage, paper-element air filter.

https://www.donaldson.com/en-us/engine/ ... cessories/

https://www.donaldson.com/en-us/engine/ ... -cleaners/

https://www.donaldson.com/en-us/engine/ ... s/general/

https://www.donaldson.com/en-us/engine/ ... ndicators/

Much of the information for this section of the magazine article, was derived from discussions on the Australian Kombi Club forum and South African Air-Cooled VW Club forum of which I am also a member.

Technical Advice > Engine air filters for very-dusty conditions?

http://www.aircooledvwsa.co.za/viewtopi ... =4&t=12592

Bay Tech Clinic > Engine & Transmission > Engine air filters for very-dusty conditions?

http://www.forums.kombiclub.com/showthread.php?t=23366

Bay Tech Clinic > Engine & Transmission > Stock air cleaner

http://www.forums.kombiclub.com/showthread.php?t=28937

During March-April 1980, whilst touring Botswana, South Africa & Swaziland in a Nissan E20 based motor-caravan, I drove on several dirt roads and unsealed, graded-aggregate (i.e. macadamised) roads, where one frequently encountered large clouds of fine, choking dust, generated by the wheels of passing vehicles.

Seeing an approaching or overtaking vehicle, there was a mad scramble to close all of the windows and ventilation vents, before we were enveloped by the dust cloud, which would otherwise cause us to cough and splutter for several minutes. It might have been useful to have had a ventilation-air filter (aka pollen filter) incorporated into the ventilation system, but such sophistication was uncommon or unknown in those days!

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Macadam

How to Grade a Gravel Road: General Principles

https://www.khplant.co.za/blog/article/ ... principles

On either dirt roads or unsealed, graded-aggregate roads, traction, road holding and stopping distance are inferior to sealed road surfaces such as concrete or “tarmac” (i.e. tarmacadam – macadamised road, sealed and stabilised using tar / asphalt / bitumen as a binding agent), so one needs to leave longer following distances and avoid violent braking, acceleration or steering.

It’s also wise to leave much longer following distances, to minimise exposure to fine dust, of both the vehicle occupants and the engine. On unsealed, graded-aggregate roads, there is also the added risk of windscreen breakage from frequent flying stones, kicked up by the wheels of vehicles one is following behind.

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Nigel A. Skeet

Independent tutor of mathematics, physics, technology & engineering, for secondary, tertiary, further & higher education.

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Upgraded 1974 Triumph Toledo 1300 (Toledo / Dolomite HL / Sprint hybrid)

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PostPosted: Sat Sep 03, 2022 8:54 pm 
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Nigel,

It isn't Paris Dakar and driving 180km/u all the time to be the first at the finish.

It's a rally for classic cars where the route is constructed so classic cars can handle. It shouldn'd be good that on day one all contesters stranded or sink in the sand by the route set out by the organisation.

I have prepared cars for various events and the main thing is still, keep it as standard and simple as possible. Don't add weight by exotic constructions but try to remove. Good quality brakepads like Ferodo is better than fitting large calipers and discs alround.

In a case of emergency the car should be able to be repaired with ducttape, wire and a big hammer. The more you put in or on, the more can fail and fall off again.

Jeroen

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Classic Kabelboom Company. For all your wiring needs. http://www.classickabelboomcompany.com


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PostPosted: Sun Sep 04, 2022 7:52 pm 
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TDC Kent Area Organiser
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Joined: Thu Mar 07, 2019 6:00 am
Posts: 150
Location: Kent
Reece.

I am in Mongolia from the 17th September to the 1st October.

If you can think of anything you may need or want to know when I am there let me know.

Cheers.

Richard.

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